Torralba d'en Salort Talayotic Settlement

Alaior, Spain

A prehistoric settlement dating from the Naviforme period (1700-1400 B.C.), in which the foundations of a circular cabin can still be seen. The main features are two talaiots, the taula enclosure, a hypostyle room, some caves dug out of the ground and the remains of other buildings used as dwellings.

The taula and its enclosure are among the largest and most beautiful on the island. The building dates from the 4th-3rd centuries B.C. and was used for worship up until the 2nd century A.D. It is built on a horseshoe-shaped layout with separate areas inside. The T of the taula consists of two huge blocks of stone, one vertical and the other horizontal, beautifully finished and standing nearly 4 metres tall. Various excavation works carried out on the site have revealed the remains of a fire, wine amphorae plus evidence that kid goats and young lambs were ritually killed and eaten. Other finds include ritual objects such as an altar, a terracotta image of the Punic goddess Tanit, the bronze figure of a bull and bronze hooves belonging to the figure of a horse. These items are on display in the Museum of Menorca and provide the most compelling evidence to support the notion that the taula enclosure was a place of worship. The settlement had its heyday during the time of Punic trading expansion, towards the 1st century B.C.

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Address

Camí d'Alč, Alaior, Spain
See all sites in Alaior

Details

Founded: 1700-1400 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olivier Odelin (3 months ago)
Attractive archeological place to visit.
Alberto Oliva (6 months ago)
small but well kept ancient village from 2000 a.c.
Jesse Godoy (13 months ago)
I climbed the top of it and the top fell on my me. Would not recom this site.
adrian beatson (2 years ago)
Worth visiting, best to have guide to explain.
Rebecca Anderson (2 years ago)
Interesting archaeological site. Avoid at midday as it's roasting! Can get a drink/ice-cream at the kiosk. Friendly and helpful lady who gave us instructions on how to get to the necropolis at cala mitjana which was also worth a visit.
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