Villa San Michele

Capri, Italy

The Villa San Michele was built around the turn of the 19th century on the Isle of Capri by the Swedish physician and author Axel Munthe.

The villa's gardens have panoramic views of the town of Capri and its harbour, the Sorrentine Peninsula, and Mount Vesuvius. The villa sits on a ledge at the top of the Phoenician Steps, between Anacapri and Capri, at a height of 327 meters above sea level.

San Michele's gardens are adorned with many relics and works of art dating from ancient Egypt and other periods of classical antiquity. They now form part of the Grandi Giardini Italiani.

In his later years, Axel Munthe wrote his haunting youthful memoir The Story of San Michele, which describes how he first discovered the island and built the villa, decorated with the remains of palaces built by the Ancient Romans which he found on his land. This colourfully written book was first published in 1929 and became an immediate worldwide success, being translated into many languages. It has been reprinted many times since then.

Between 1919 and 1920, Munthe was an unwilling landlord to the outrageous socialite and muse Luisa Casati, who took possession of Villa San Michele. This was described by the Scottish author Compton Mackenzie in his diaries.

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Address

Via Axel Munthe 26, Capri, Italy
See all sites in Capri

Details

Founded: 1885
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

sukhpreet kaur (3 years ago)
You will get to see world's best view. Its the top of capri Island. You will be able to see full view of the capri. Need to buy a cable car ticket for 12 euro. Worth to watch. Check my pictures
Joanna Brown (3 years ago)
We didn't enter the villa nor pay the 8 Euro entry fee and thanks to our tour guides, we were able to achieve the same views by walking around the villa to the back.
Julian Davies (3 years ago)
Lovely old villa away from the crowds of daytime Capri. Beautiful gardens and views, not forgetting a rooftop cafe for refreshments.
Jeffrey Potter (3 years ago)
If you are left with free time in Anacapri it has a great view from an old church on the property. There's also a 3200 year old Sphix you can see up close as well. The garden is well keep, but nothing special. If you want a little more history of the island it's worth a stop and not expensive.
Lennart Bösch (3 years ago)
Beautiful villa and garden. Great cafe with good food but the reason to go is certainly the stunning view. Just awesome to relax, hang out and enjoy some coffee or food. Surprisingly not very touristy, basically empty at the time we went.
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