Villa Jovis is a Roman palace on Capri, southern Italy, built by emperor Tiberius and completed in AD 27. Tiberius mainly ruled from there until his death in AD 37.

Villa Jovis is the largest of the twelve Tiberian villas on Capri mentioned by Tacitus. The entire complex, spanning several terraces and a difference in elevation of about 40 m, covers some 7,000 m² (1.7 acres). While the remaining eight levels of walls and staircases only hint at the grandeur the building must have had in its time, recent reconstructions have shown the villa to be a remarkable testament to 1st-century Roman architecture.

The north wing of the building contained the living quarters, while the south wing saw administrative use. The east wing was meant for receptions, whereas the west wing featured an open-walled hall (ambulatio) which offered a scenic view towards Anacapri.

As water was difficult to come by where the villa was built, Roman engineers constructed an intricate system for the collection of rainwater from the roofs and a large cistern that supplied the palace with fresh water.

South of the main building there are remains of a watch tower (specula) for the quick telegraphic exchange of messages with the mainland, e.g. by fire or smoke.

Access to the complex is only possible on foot, and involves an uphill walk of about two kilometres from Capri town.

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Address

Via Tiberio 79, Capri, Italy
See all sites in Capri

Details

Founded: 27 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ben Martin (13 months ago)
An old place full of history. The view is astonishing too. The audio guide is convenient but a bit imprecise in its guidance. We got lost several times during the tour. I really recommend the park next to the "villa" , since the view is even better and the park is free.
Bar Dado (13 months ago)
The place is interesting but after paying 6€ there’s not much to see!
Seb Harding (14 months ago)
Interesting building with interesting history. Many parts unfortunately closed off while we were there. Not much information supplied
Alexander P (14 months ago)
A fascinating historic site, and a pleasant walk up from Capri town
Alin Iacob (2 years ago)
Don't go there, it's not worth it. Long walk uphill, you'll loose most of the day. Old ruin, not restored, no plants, no beautiful flowers, like on the other villas. Way too expensive for what it has to offer. Hint: look at pictures before deciding..
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