The Mound of Down is an ancient monument which gives County Down its name. Originally the home of Celtair - Rath Celtair - this became a stronghold for the Dál Fiatach, a powerful army who once owned the Isle of Man. It is a good example of an Iron Age defensive earthwork in the middle of which a Norman Motte and Bailey was built by John de Courcy after his defeat of Rory Mac Donlevy in 1177.

Originally on the shores of Strangford Lough this site was an excellent military base. The land around has been reclaimed since the 1700s. Today the site is an impressive motte and bailey style fort which was abandoned before completion.

From the top of the incomplete mound you have an excellent view over Down Cathedral and Inch Abbey. In the distance are the Mourne Mountains. During the summer the site is left to grow as a wildlflower meadow.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in United Kingdom

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paul Stevenson (2 years ago)
Iron age earthworks fort. Mound within is a curious shape. Between Downpatrick town and Marshes. The whole area has references to the didtant past with the Nearby scenic ruins of Inch Abbey. Down Cathedral which is reputed to be the burial place of St Patrick.
Baron Radical (2 years ago)
Amazing. I can comfortably let my greyhound out here to run around and the 360 view from the very top is lovely
Tiarnán Millar (3 years ago)
Inaccessible, poorly signposted, neglected
Simon McGarry (3 years ago)
Peaceful and tranquil
AOK Curator (4 years ago)
Tough climb but worth it for the view.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.