Sturehof Castle

Salem, Sweden

The history of Sturehof manor date from the Middle Ages. The small village was owned by count and stateman Svante Sture, who was murdered by King Erik XIV. His son Mauritz Sture named the manor as Sturehof. In the next to centuries Sturehov was owned by several powerful noble families like Oxenstiernas and Wrangels.

Johan Liljencrantz , Gustav III's "Finance minister", acquired the property in 1778 as a summer lodge. The farmhouse was burnt and only the two wings from the 1600s was still standing. He let the architect Carl Fredrik Adelcrantz draw a new main building. Adelcrantz was at that time a very famous architect who designed also the Gustav III's opera house in Stockholm. The English garden was built in the 1700s to the north of the manor.

The main building was furnished and decorated by contemporary skilled craftsman and decorative painters, among them Louis Masreliez . As co-owner of Marie porcelain factory had Liljencrantz opportunity to gain Marieberg stoves to their new building. Therefore Sturehov has today the largest collection Marieberg stoves in Sweden, a total of 17 pieces. The most magnificent is "Liljecrantz fireplace”, also drawn to a Swedish stamp. Johan Liljencrantz did not stay long at Sturehov. After his first wife died in 1788 he built Norsborgs mansion and lived there with his new wife, Eleonora.

Today the manor is managed by the Real Estate Department of the municipality. There is a café in the south wing.

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Details

Founded: 1770s
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jenny Vikholm (3 years ago)
Trevligt ställe för en familjeutflykt, ta med egen matsäck eller köp på plats men kolla så att kaféet är öppet innan, de har sommaröppet och därefter öppet vissa helger under vår och höst, detsamma för slottet, men krukmakeriet brukar ha mer generösa öppettider. Finns toaletter vid parkeringen, även handikapp, och i kaféet. Jättegod mat/fika på kaféet men lite dyrt, de gör allt själva så brödet är jättebra! Åk sedan ett varv runt Bornsjön och titta på natur och vilda djur!
Lionel METZ (3 years ago)
Nice but sadly closed when I came.
Elisabet Thijssen (3 years ago)
Nice place
Jim Engström (3 years ago)
The coffee here is very good and the surrounding is lovely during the warmer part of the year.
Elliot Sverin (4 years ago)
I bit hard to get to, but just walking around the area in the middle of the summer makes it worthwile
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