Monkodonja is a hill fort occupied about 1800–1200 BC during the Bronze Age, located near the city of Rovinj. It is located on a hillside surrounded by a spatial area, a form of irregular ellipse stretching east-west, 160 m × 250 m. The settlement was surrounded with three concentric walls and two entrances that have explored so far (so called Western and Northern). The defensive wall surrounding the settlement was about 1 km long, about 3 m wide and at least 3 m tall. It was built by laying stone in the drywall technique. The stone was peeled off the hill, and its removal resulted in a useful surface. Approximately 1,000 people lived in the well-organized settlement: on the highest part was the acropolis, below it the upper town and still lower the lower town.

The Acropolis, where the higher layer of communities lived, had a nearly rectilinear space. In other parts of the settlement there was a crafts area. The houses differed with the position, size and manner of construction, and they were separated by passages and streets. Each had a hearth and numerous fragments of pottery pots originated from local workshops, but pots also came from the far east of the eastern Mediterranean. It was the first finding of fragments of Micens (Bronze Age) bowl in Istria. The Monkodonja was an important point in the communications of the northern Adriatic with Central Europe and the Aegean.

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Rovinj, Croatia
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Details

Founded: 1800-1200 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Sertic (13 months ago)
Even if you're not a history enthusiast it's a nice place to visit for a scenic view or picnic. It is easily accessible with parking place in Kukoletovica next to Pula - Rovinj road. From there there are signs pointing to Monkodonja which is about 1km walk uphil. For a few thousand year old structure it is in decent condition, and there are few informative boards with info panels on site. There is no much shade on top, except underneath one oak tree.
HELENA PANIJAN (19 months ago)
Beautiful location with such a long history. Free entry and great informative boards.
TheEvdriver (3 years ago)
I love such hillforts. They are the beginning of our urban society.
peter pendragon (3 years ago)
Beautiful place and full of history !!
Judit Baski (3 years ago)
Quite a lot bigger and much more interesting to visit than expected from an archeological site. The informational signs were very informative and it was quite easy to figure out from the rocks what they referred to. The place presents a good view of the sea as well, always a plus.
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