The oldest part of Lovö Church has been dated back to the later part of the 12th century. According Berit Wallenberg it was built as early as the 11th century. It is also believed that an even older wooden church existed on this site. Church sermons are held in the church, normally once a month, and for certain Christian holidays.

The church is unusually small and narrow. It was extended to the east, first in the 13th and further in the 17th century. Churches built during this time were built with a weapons room, a foyer where people going to church had to lay down their arms before entering the church itself. This weapons house was demolished in 1798, and an entry was made in the west side of the attached church tower. There are also five Viking Age memorial runestones that are located outside the Lovö church.

The sanctuary of the church was created around 1670. The architect is believed to be Nicodemus Tessin the Elder, who was working on Drottningholm Palace around this same time. Inside the church are 30 gravestones, several of which belonged to people employed at Drottningholm palace. The interior was renovated in 2004.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bruce Salamon (2 months ago)
Stunning church, with happy people working there. Lots of Viking stones outside. A long history can be seen inside.
Lars Martinsson (2 months ago)
Fin kyrka som var stängd, hade varit kul att få se den inuti
Rikard Prüzelius (3 months ago)
Fin kyrka
Kelly Mcdonald (4 months ago)
Simply beautiful
David Igra (7 months ago)
Kyrkan ligger oerhört vackert och det är nästan svårt att förstå att man efter så kort tids resa från centrala Stockholm befinner sig i ett sådant naturskönt område. Kyrkan i sig är också en vacker sådan och den närbelagda klockgården medger vid rätt tidpunkt en härlig ljudbakgrund. Har man besökt denna kyrka kan man med fördel även besöka Munsö kyrka för att närmare försöka se likheterna mellan dessa kyrkor. Det finns många, så ta er tid. Kanske något av en sevärdhet även på grund av att den ökända nazisten Carin Göring är begraven inte mindre än två gånger här.
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