Caños de Carmona Roman Aqueduct

Seville, Spain

The Caños de Carmona (Pipes of Carmona) are the remains of a Roman aqueduct 17.5 kilometres long, later rebuilt by the Almohads, which connected the cities of Carmona and Seville, and which was fully operational until its demolition in 1912. It was primary constructed from bricks, and consisted of approximately 400 arches standing on pillars, with additional upper arcade sections in some places. It is believed to be the only example of this type of Roman construction in Spain.

The aqueduct was constructed approximately between 68 to 65 BC, the same period as the construction of the Walls of Seville and during Julius Caesar's term as quaestor. It was renovated and partially re-built between 1171 and 1172 by Almohad caliph Abu Yaqub Yusuf. During this period, he also built the Giralda mosque and minaret, the Puente de Barcas on the Wad al-Kebir river, and the Buhaira palace and gardens, for which the aqueduct also supplied water. Additional repairs were made in the thirteenth century when the Granada War began.

Three five-arch stretches of the aqueduct have survived in Seville.

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Details

Founded: 68-65 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Ayoube Bahoussi (19 months ago)
Missing you seville, the city center is really nice to see, many attractions places , restaurants and coffees, Just enjoy your day
Carmelo Gonzalez Nuñez (3 years ago)
Ok
Carmelo Gonzalez Nuñez (3 years ago)
Ok
Ameed Abu Ghazal (3 years ago)
Beautiful structure and great place to visit
Ameed Abu Ghazal (3 years ago)
Beautiful structure and great place to visit
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