San Isidoro del Campo Monastery

Santiponce, Spain

Located in Santiponce, the Monasterio de San Isidoro del Campo was founded somewhere near the Roman ruins of Itálica, by Alfonso Pérez de Guzmán and María Coronel Alonso in 1301, where according to tradition San Isidoro de Sevilla had been buried. His remains were discovered and moved to León in 1063.

Since its foundation, the monastery has been under the spiritual and temporary administration of different religious orders. In 1432 the Hieronymites of the Order of Saint Jerome significantly reformed the monastery which is reflected in the concept of monastic life and in the decoration.

In this unique fortress-monastery, with a double church, the Gothic style is juxtaposed with clear Languedoc and Mudejar influences, where the Almohad tradition is clearly visible. Unlike Cistercian austerity, the Hieronymite monastery is decorated with murals that make up what is possibly one of the most outstanding ensembles in Spain.

The monastery was extended and became richer over the centuries, eventually having a tower, a belfry, five cloisters and, next to the monastic quarters, the attorney general's quarters, a hostelry and the farming facilities expected of an institution aspiring to self-sufficiency.

During the Baroque, period, this medieval establishment was transformed with altarpieces (the two by Martínez Montañés on public display are worthy of special mention), stalls, new murals and plaster vaults.

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Santiponce, Spain
See all sites in Santiponce

Details

Founded: 1301
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.andalucia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philip Smith (2 years ago)
Lovely wall paintings in interesting monastery setting. Worth a visit.
Mike Johnson (2 years ago)
Casiodoro de Reina, 500th anniversary of his birth in 2020, was a monk here who translated the Bible into Spanish.
Aaron Ochse (2 years ago)
Beautiful monastery just outside Seville. Well preserved frescoes. Peaceful cloister. Brought together by an altar emblematic of the Sevillan golden age. Free to visit and all explanation signs have an English translation. Do not miss.
Jackie Wilkinson (2 years ago)
Absolutely stunning murals, ancient books, beautiful altar and many precious articles. Well worth a visit.
Dr.Vivek Raskar (2 years ago)
Good monastery, lots of historical development happened here.
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