Roman Temple of Córdoba

Córdoba, Spain

The construction of Roman temple in Córdoba began during the reign of Emperor Claudius (41-54 AD) and ended some forty years later, during the reign of Emperor Domitian (81-96 CE). Presumably it was dedicated to the imperial cult. The temple underwent some changes in the 2nd century, reforms that coincide with the relocation of the colonial forum.

In the area had already been found architectural elements, such as drums of columns, capitals, etc. all in marble, so the area was known as los marmolejos. This area of Córdoba could become between the 1st century and the 2nd century, as the provincial forum of the Colonia Patricia, title that received the city during the Roman rule.

The building was situated on a podium and consisted of six columns on its front facade and ten columns on each side. Currently, the only remains left of the building are its foundation, the stairs, the altar and some shafts of columns and capitals.

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Details

Founded: c. 50 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amie Bentley (5 months ago)
Very disappointing to be completely honest. I can imagine in the day it was amazing but you can hardly see it from around the barriers
Khawaja Fahad (6 months ago)
It was a bit underwhelming. Only the columns remain of the once great Roman temple
Monica Rivera (7 months ago)
A bit disappointing structure. It was under remodeling. Columns were nice though. Free to watch from the street so if in the area, pass by.
Barry Cooter (2 years ago)
Nice to see old ruins in a modern town
Akinyemi Makanjuola (2 years ago)
The Tempol Roman has the remains of Roman Temple in the cury hall 9f Cordoba.
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