Roman Temple of Córdoba

Córdoba, Spain

The construction of Roman temple in Córdoba began during the reign of Emperor Claudius (41-54 AD) and ended some forty years later, during the reign of Emperor Domitian (81-96 CE). Presumably it was dedicated to the imperial cult. The temple underwent some changes in the 2nd century, reforms that coincide with the relocation of the colonial forum.

In the area had already been found architectural elements, such as drums of columns, capitals, etc. all in marble, so the area was known as los marmolejos. This area of Córdoba could become between the 1st century and the 2nd century, as the provincial forum of the Colonia Patricia, title that received the city during the Roman rule.

The building was situated on a podium and consisted of six columns on its front facade and ten columns on each side. Currently, the only remains left of the building are its foundation, the stairs, the altar and some shafts of columns and capitals.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: c. 50 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Amie Bentley (14 months ago)
Very disappointing to be completely honest. I can imagine in the day it was amazing but you can hardly see it from around the barriers
Khawaja Fahad (15 months ago)
It was a bit underwhelming. Only the columns remain of the once great Roman temple
Monica Rivera (16 months ago)
A bit disappointing structure. It was under remodeling. Columns were nice though. Free to watch from the street so if in the area, pass by.
Barry Cooter (2 years ago)
Nice to see old ruins in a modern town
Akinyemi Makanjuola (2 years ago)
The Tempol Roman has the remains of Roman Temple in the cury hall 9f Cordoba.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.