Bujalance Castle

Bujalance, Spain

Castillo de Bujalance was built in the 10th century during the Caliphate of Abd-ar-Rahman III. It is a clear example of Muslim military architecture in Al-Andalus. It subsequently underwent several modernizations, most recently in 1512, which were paid for by Queen Joanna of Castile.

It is rectangular in shape, measuring 59 metres north-south and 51 metres east-west. The castle's original name, 'tower of the snake', and the fact that it had seven towers, led to the current name of the city and its coat of arms. In 1963, the Ministry of Culture declared the site a Bien de Interés Cultural monument. Currently, its courtyard is used as a cultural space, which is in the process of being cataloging, restored and reconstructed. Highlights include the Festival of Theatre, Music and Dance (Nights at the Citadel) and Andalusian Dinner during the summer months.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

leo cua (21 months ago)
Good
Carmelo Alcazar (2 years ago)
El castillo una Maravilla Me gustó Hasta pronto
Carmelo Alcazar (2 years ago)
The castle a Wonder I liked it See you soon
Netálgu _tv (2 years ago)
Precioso sitio para visitar por su historia fascinante, la pega, lo mismo de siempre tiempos de espera, disponible para actos
Netálgu Tv - Aerosistemas (2 years ago)
Beautiful site to visit for its fascinating history, the paste, the same as always waiting times, available for events
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