Calahorra Tower

Córdoba, Spain

The Calahorra tower (Torre de la Calahorra) is a fortified gate in the historic centre of Córdoba. The edifice is of Islamic origin. It was first erected by the Almohad Caliphate to protect the nearby Roman Bridge on the Guadalquivir. The tower, standing on the left bank of the river, originally consisted of an arched gate between two. A third tower was added to the existing ones, in the shape of two cylinder connecting them.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fiona Mason (3 years ago)
Excellent value. Very informative audio guide
Jim Paul (3 years ago)
Definitely worth your time as a first stop in Cordoba. Physical models of the mosque and Alhambra are excellent.
Geraldine Koh (3 years ago)
The museum is on the small side but it gives good insight to the life of Moors back in the day, and links to science and architecture Good view from the top-don't miss it Down side is it is a little expensive, since there is no museum pass in this city, it quickly adds up as you visit the museums and churches.
Ham Solo (3 years ago)
After walking across the old Roman bridge in the heat, it makes for a nice way to into the shade and sit dow a bit. The entry cost is 4.5 Euros and includes an audio-guide offered in a few different languages. Audio quality is choppy at times, but works. The tower offers great views of the surrounding areas from windows as well as from the roof top.
Jeremy Western (3 years ago)
Fascinating insights on how Islam, Judaism and Christianity flourished side-by-side in Cordoba. Great model of the mesquite as originally built. The audio explanation is lengthy and sometimes tricky to synchronise but worth listening to. And view from the top worth the ticket on its own.
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