Córdoba Synagogue

Córdoba, Spain

Córdoba Synagogue is a historic edifice in the Jewish Quarter of Córdoba, built in 1315. The synagogue's small size points to it having possibly been the private synagogue of a wealthy man. It was decorated according to the best Mudejar tradition.

After the expulsion of the Jews in 1492, the synagogue was seized by the authorities and converted into a hospital for people suffering from rabies (hydrophobia), the Hospital Santo Quiteria. In 1588, the building was acquired by the shoemakers guild, who used it as a community center and small chapel, changing the patron saint of the building to Santos Crispin-Crispian, the patron saint of shoemakers. Since 19th century it has undergone several phases of the restoration.

It is the only synagogue in Córdoba to escape destruction during years of persecution. Although it no longer functions as a Jewish house of worship, it is open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1315
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julie Stroud (2 years ago)
It is very small, but a real gem.
Julie Stroud (2 years ago)
It is very small, but a real gem.
ampren7a (2 years ago)
No entry fee and a quick visit into Cordoba's jewish past.
ampren7a (2 years ago)
No entry fee and a quick visit into Cordoba's jewish past.
Sekhar Visvanathan (2 years ago)
A beautiful historic site in the midst of Juderia in Cordoba. One of the only three remaining Synagogues in Spain, the other two are in Toledo. Should visit when ambling around the alleyways, but do have a guide who can explain it's historical significance and how it was rediscovered in the 19th century
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