Lighthouse of Genoa

Genoa, Italy

The Lighthouse of Genoa (Lanterna di Genova) serves as a symbol and a landmark for Genoa. Built of masonry, at 76 m it is the world's fifth tallest lighthouse and the second tallest 'traditional' one. Between 1543 and the construction of the lighthouse on Île Vierge, France in 1902, it was the tallest lighthouse in the world. When measured as a whole with the natural rock on which it stands, as it is commonly perceived and represented, its height is 117 m, which would make it the second tallest lighthouse in the world, the tallest in Europe, and the tallest traditional lighthouse.

It is constructed in two square portions, each one capped by a terrace; the whole structure is crowned by a lantern from which the light is shone.

The tower was shelled during the bombardment of Genoa by the French in 1684; the windows which were damaged were replaced on the orders of Louis XIV in 1692. In 1778 construction began on a new lighting system designed to counteract damage done to the lighting apparatus over several centuries of use. In 1840 a rotating Fresnel lens was installed; the system was formally inaugurated in January 1841. It was modified up until the end of the century in order to increase its capability; the entire lighthouse was modernised again in 1913, but the electrification was poorly done, and had to be refitted in 1936. One last major restoration project, begun after American and British air attacks of World War II, was completed in 1956. It is also the symbol surrounding the Derby della Lanterna between two football clubs, Genoa C.F.C. and U.C. Sampdoria.

Adjacent to the tower is the Museo della Lanterna. The museum mainly covers the history of the city and the port, and contains a good deal of archival material. Some of the displays also cover the history of navigation and navigational aids in Genoa, and describe various signaling systems that have been used at sea. Part of a Fresnel lens, similar to that found in the lighthouse itself, is shown in such a manner as to display its inner workings. In addition to the permanent displays, temporary exhibits are also sometimes shown at the museum.

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    Founded: 1543
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    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

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    User Reviews

    Tamás Kundakker (2 years ago)
    Great view to the city, but you have to walk a lot.
    Liliana Cortes (2 years ago)
    This was awesome. The walk from the metro station is a bit long but there is a clearly indicated path with some information about the lighthouse. The museum is not very big of full of things but is beautiful to walk up and have a loot at the city. I recommend this visit.
    Daniel Saenger (2 years ago)
    City Emblem, stunning
    Amir Ibrahim (2 years ago)
    Very nice view of the city and sea.
    Alice InWonderland (2 years ago)
    Fantastic view from the rooftop of the biggest lighthouse in Europe. Enjoyed 100 %
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