Ameglia Castle

Ameglia, Italy

Ameglia Castle was mentioned from the 10th century among the castles belonging to the Bishopof Luni. Ameglia was an attractive site, as it was equipped with a court, a fish market and aport and was then supposed to have a great economic grouth. The castle was also mentioned in another document of 1174, in which it is written that the inhabitants of Pietracoperta – a territory destroyed by the Genoese - had lived in Ameglia and equipped it with a defensive tower during that year.

The castle became then the residence of the Bishop of Luni until the 14th century, when it was owned by Castruccio Castracani. In 1470 the village and the fortress were sold for 6.000 gold ducati to the Banco di San Giorgio from the Viscounts. From that moment on, the destiny of this area was linked to Genoa.

The defensive function of the castle ended in the 19th century, when it became the seat of the Municipality of Ameglia.

The construction period is uncertain, but it could date back to the Late Middle Ages due to its position close to the ridge between the moth of the Marinasco River and the monastery of Santa Croce in Punta Corvo. It was used as path to reach the hill of Montemarcello. In the 12th and 13th centuries, the village was built around the castle.

Architecture

The structure of the castle is located on top of a hill overlooking the valley and stands in the middle of the village. The fortress is composed by a 2 floors rectangular building – where there is evidence of several reconstructions – by a circular tower and bythe trapezoidal defensive walls. Starting from the core of the castle, along the centuries new houses were built around the fortress. This phenomenon originated the fortified village, whose structure consists in concentric circles.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.museoleduefortezze.it

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

stefano paglini (8 months ago)
Tipico borgo ligure molto suggestivo anche nel periodo invernale. Consiglio una visita anche al suo castello pieno di Storia.
Carla Ceruti (13 months ago)
Esternamente il castello è molto bello e situato in un borgo incantevole peccato che sia chiuso e tutti gli eventi dell'estate siano stati cancellati perché ... si sono resi conto che non c'è un'uscita si sicurezza! Ma da quando i castelli hanno un'uscita di sicurezza?
Jerry Schultze (2 years ago)
Nice place. Dont park between yellow lines.
Iustin Raducanu (3 years ago)
Good
Jiri Prochazka (4 years ago)
Beautiful and historical city with charming churche, tiny streets and views of the surrounding countryside.
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