Lerici Castle

Lerici, Italy

One of the main sights of Lerici is its castle which since its first founding in 1152 was used to help control the entrance of the Gulf of La Spezia. The magnificent castle rises on a rocky promontory overlooking the Bay of Lerici and is considered one of the most impressive and beautiful fortification inall of Liguria.

Due to its location in the Gulf of La Spezia, it has a rich history of disputes between the naval powers in the Mediterranean during the Middle Ages, evidence of which can be found in the inscriptions still legible at the Castle's entrance.

The first phase is referred to as the Pisan domination. It was the Pisans that began construction in 1152 of the oldest structure of the castle - its pentagonal tower. The Castle’s initial structure was built in 1241 while Lerici was occupied by the Pisans and later extended and reinforced as its role developed during the rule of the Genoese.

The third phase began in 1555 and consisted of the completion of all the fortifications resulting in the current shape of the Castle and let to reinforcing the Lerici Castle’ strategic importance on the eastern border of Liguria.

Today the castle contains a museum of palaeontology.

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Details

Founded: 1152
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.liguriaguide.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mohammad Al-Sakran (2 months ago)
Very nice place …
Justin Thompson (4 months ago)
Nice staff and a fairly easy walk given the heat. Beautiful panoramic view of Lerici as well.
Dan Cristian (5 months ago)
Good experience and the people working there are very passionate about their work
Pascal Abundes (6 months ago)
Beautiful castle. Unfortunately we couldn't get inside
Yili Zhou (8 months ago)
Very beautiful place to visit.
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