Solberga Abbey Ruins

Visby, Sweden

Solberga Abbey was a Cistercian nunnery in operation from 1246 until at least 1469. It was located outside Visby on Gotland until 1404, and then in Visby. It was the only nunnery ot the island of Gotland.

Solberga Abbey was likely a daughter convent of Vreta Abbey. On 12 August 1246, Bishop Laurentius of Linköping mentions that the first nuns had been sent to Gotland, were Solberga was the only nunnery on the island. In contrast to what was previously believed, Solberga was a large convent with many members. It had both an abbess and a prioress. In 1361, many fallen from the Battle of Visby was buried on the abbey's land, were a cross, which still stands, was erected.

The abbey was presumably destroyed by the war between the Victual Brothers, the Teutonic Knights and the forces of the Kalmar Union in 1398-1403. In 1404, the abbess applied for help from the Master of the Teutonic Knights in Prussia, then in control of Gotland, to found a new abbey. The nuns were allowed to reside in the St. Jacob chapel in Visby, where they lived until they moved in to St. Gertrud chapel in Visby in 1469, then described as the diminished nuns of Visby. During the 15th century, the nuns were still, event though no longer in residence at Solberga, referred to as the Solberga nuns.

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Artillerigatan 2B, Visby, Sweden
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Details

Founded: 1246
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

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