Carboeiro Monastery

Silleda, Spain

The Monastery of San Lorenzo de Carboeiro is one of the most outstanding architectural works of the late Romanesque, the transition to the Gothic, in Galicia.

Its gestation was founded in the year 939 AD. When the construction was completed, the priest Felix was chosen as the first abbot of the community.

Its moments of greatest splendor were between 11th and 13th centuries. Abbot Fernando, from 1162 to 1192, expanded the church. At this stage the monastery belonged to the 'Cluny' order, and for a long period has a rich estate.

During the 15th century lawsuits, neglect and mismanagement, lead to the community’s ruin, and in 1500 by order of Ferdinand and Isabella, it is relegated to the status of priory, a farm for San Martiño Pinario in Santiago, prolonging its decline, including a prison built for monks in 1794  and  until 1836, coinciding with tits confiscation by  Mendizabal, and its total abandonment.

The church and some other buildings are still in good condition, after the works of restoration and recovery made during the second half of the twentieth century.

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Details

Founded: 936 AD
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charo Rey (10 months ago)
Interesting and nice walk around it.
Maria Blanco (2 years ago)
Fillo of caracter
Orestes Carracedo (2 years ago)
Beautiful building surrounded by nature. Truly a nice place to explore una a calm sunny day. Stay for the sunset and make sure you bring a nice camera with you.
Alejandro García Permuy (3 years ago)
AMAZING EXPERIENCE. VISIT THE CRIPT
Andrea Urbán (3 years ago)
So this is the place where you pay 1.5 euros entry fee and you just wander around. First we looked around in the monastery, which is a wonderful building. You can climb up to the towers and down to the crypt. Really nice. Then you walk down to the bridge, which is again a tranquil place, fantastic structure. And it is not finished yet! Take the botanical walk, halfway through you will find a small house with a path leading down to the river bank.... take bathing suit! The water is fresh but clean, sunbathing there and listening to the water flowing. Such a magical and quiet place! Absolute worth to visit!
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