Castro de Vigo

Vigo, Spain

The O Castro site is Vigo’s archaeological site par excellence: this was the origin of what is now the largest city in Galicia, between the second century BC and the third century AD. When you step on the stones of this museum site, the O Castro de Vigo. A Orixe da cidade, you’ll discover where the first inhabitants of Vigo lived.

The Castro is a 1 mile² archaeological site that includes the reconstruction of three castreño buildings pertaining to one of the largest and most evolved towns in Galicia. This small part of the Vigo oppidum shows us how people lived in castros 2,000 years ago.

The archaeological site is located on the slopes of O Castro Mountain, right in the centre of Vigo. Take the opportunity to explore its nature trails and climb to the top, where you’ll see the remains of the old walled city and enjoy the splendour of the Vigo estuary from the O Castro viewpoint.

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Details

Founded: 2nd century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.turismodevigo.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julia O (12 months ago)
Love the pre-Roman history.
Hayden Arias (2 years ago)
The castros were beautiful. The guide on the premises was very helpful and knowledgeable about the history of the excavation site.
Stan Marco (2 years ago)
Tremendous multi level views of Vigo the city and the harbour port. Be prepared for a long and tough climb to top. Worth the visit and the exercise!
Samir Azzam (2 years ago)
Amazing view to vigo river and cies y ons islands
Chris Owens (2 years ago)
Fantastic views and great historic site, again spoiled by loads of graffiti
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