Religious sites in United Kingdom

Dromore Cathedral

The present Dromore Cathedral was originally constructed in 1661 by Jeremy Taylor, Bishop of Down and Connor and has been several times expanded to its present size. The first church on the site was a wattle and daub building constructed by St Colman circa 510. This was replaced by a medieval church which was destroyed in the late 16th century. The church was again rebuilt and in 1609 elevated to the 'Cathedral C ...
Founded: 1661 | Location: Dromore, United Kingdom

Clonard Monastery

Clonard Monastery was developed by the Catholic Redemptorists religious order. Members of this religious order came to Belfast originally in 1896. They initially built a small tin church in the grounds of Clonard House in 1897. In 1890 a monastery was opened in these grounds and in 1911 the Church of the Holy Redeemer opened in the grounds and replaced the tin church. Clonard is also used as a music venue for many ...
Founded: 1890 | Location: Belfast, United Kingdom

Mount Grace Priory

Mount Grace Priory was built in 1398 for the Carthusian monks (a silent order). The Priory was dissolved by Henry VIII and a manor house was built around its ruins. In the 20th century it became an Arts and Crafts style county house. Today the house, priory ruins and gardens are open to visitors.
Founded: Middle Ages | Location: North Yorkshire, United Kingdom

St. Malachy's Church

Saint Malachy"s Church is the third oldest Catholic Church in the city of Belfast. The foundation stone was laid in 1841. On December 15, 1844 Dr William Crolly, Archbishop of Armagh and Primate of All Ireland dedicated the building. The church is regarded as one of the finest examples of Tudor Revival churches in Ireland. It was designed by Thomas Jackson of Waterford and it is in the ecclesiastical sty ...
Founded: 1841-1844 | Location: Belfast, United Kingdom

Christ Church Cathedral

The first church was built on the site of  Christ Church Cathedral in Lisburn in the early 1600s by Sir Fulke Conway as a chapel of ease for his new castle at what was then called Lisnagarvey. It was consecrated in 1623 and dedicated to St Thomas, but was destroyed along with much of the town during the rebellion of 1641. The church was quickly rebuilt and in 1662 St Thomas"s was designated the cathedral church a ...
Founded: 1708 | Location: Lisburn, United Kingdom

St. Clement's Church

St Clement"s Church is dedicated to Pope Clement I. According to Dean Donald Munro (in 1549), the church was built for the Chiefs of the MacLeods of Harris, who lived in Dunvegan Castle in Skye, probably from about 1520, and is not considered the first church on the site although there is no clear evidence of an older Celtic church. Munro described the church as a monastery, but as there is no evidence hinting to a m ...
Founded: c. 1520 | Location: Outer Hebrides, United Kingdom

Down Cathedral

Down Cathedral location is an ancient ecclesiastical site dedicated to the Holy Trinity recorded in the 12th century. In 1124 St Malachy became Bishop of Down, and set about repairing and enlarging the Cathedral. In 1177, Sir John de Courcy (Norman conqueror of Ulster) brought in Benedictine monks and expelled Augustinian monks settled there by St Malachy. De Courcy, who had enraged the king by his seizure of la ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Downpatrick, United Kingdom

Glenarm Friary

In the early fifteenth century, Franciscan Third Order Regular communities began to be established in Ireland. In 1445 the archdeacon of Connor was sent a mandate by Pope Eugenius VI, authorising him to establish a Franciscan Third Order Regular friary in his diocese. A 1580 map of the County Antrim coastline shows the friary at ‘Glanarme’ on the other side of the river from the castle. It was probably closed by the ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Glenarm, United Kingdom

Peel Cathedral

The Cathedral Church of Saint German was built in 1879–84. The Patron of the Cathedral, St German of Man, was a Celtic missionary and holy man who lived from about 410 to 474. The original cathedral of St German was inside the walls of Peel Castle and was built sometime in the 12th century when St Patrick's Isle was in the possession of Norse kings. At that time the church followed the Sarum Rite, prevalent thro ...
Founded: 1879-1884 | Location: Peel, United Kingdom

Fishermen's Chapel

The walls of the ancient Fishermen's Chapel are reputed to date from the middle of the 6th century, but some authorities give a later date. It is however only a few monastic chapels survived the destruction of over fifty others at the hands of the Reformers in the 16th century. The material used in the chapel is the same as was used in the parish church: limpet shells crushed and dissolved with boiling sea-water. The ston ...
Founded: c. 550 AD | Location: Jersey, United Kingdom

Little Chapel

The Little Chapel created in July 1914 by Brother Déodat. He planned to create a miniature version of the grotto and basilica at Lourdes, the Rosary Basilica. It has been said that it is the smallest functioning chapel in Europe, if not the world, and it is believed to be the world’s smallest consecrated church. The chapel was originally 9 feet long by 4.5 feet wide. After taking criticism from other brother ...
Founded: 1914 | Location: Guernsey, United Kingdom

St Winefride's Well

St Winefride's Well is a healing spring that has been visited by pilgrims for more than a thousand years. Known as the 'Lourdes of Wales', it is still probably the oldest continually visited pilgrimage site in Great Britain. The healing waters have been said to cause miraculous cures. The legend of Saint Winifred tells how, in AD 660, Caradoc, the son of a local prince, severed the head of the young Winifred after she sp ...
Founded: c. 660 AD | Location: Holywell, United Kingdom

Fortrose Cathedral Ruins

Fortrose Cathedral was the episcopal seat of the medieval Scottish diocese of Ross. It is probable that the original site of the diocese was at Rosemarkie (as early as AD 700), but by the 13th century the canons had relocated a short distance to the south-west to the site known as Fortrose or Chanonry. The first recorded bishop, from around 1130, was Macbeth. According to Gervase of Canterbury, in the early 13th century t ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Fortrose, United Kingdom

St. Brelade's Church

The date of the present St. Brelade's is unknown, but it is mentioned in deeds of patronage. In AD 1035, Robert of Normandy confirmed the patronage of the church to the monastery of Montivilliers, which shows that the church was here before 1035. The chancel is the oldest part of the building. The original building extended some six feet into the nave. It was then only a small monastic chapel. Early in the 12th century St ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Jersey, United Kingdom

Old St Peter's Church

Old St Peter"s Church is a ruined parish church in Thurso. It dates to at least 1125, and at one time was the principal church for the county, administered by the Bishops of Caithness. Early in the 16th century, the vicarage of Thorso was held by Sir John Mathesoun chancellor of Caithness, on whose demission or otherwise Queen Mary in 1547 presented Master John Craig to the benefice. Master Walter Innes, who appears ...
Founded: before 1125 | Location: Thurso, United Kingdom

Brechin Cathedral

Brechin Cathedral dates from the 13th century. Immediately adjoining the cathedral to the southwest stands the Round Tower, built about 1000 A.D.  The western gable with its flamboyant window, Gothicdoor and massive square tower, parts of the (much truncated) choir, and the nave pillars and clerestory are all that is left of the original edifice. The modern stained glass in the chancel is reckoned amongst the fin ...
Founded: 13th century | Location: Brechin, United Kingdom

Grey Abbey

Grey Abbey is a ruined Cistercian priory in the village of Greyabbey. It was founded in 1193, by John de Courcy"s wife, Affreca (daughter of Godred Olafsson, King of the Isles), as a daughter house of Holmcultram Abbey in Cumbria. It had declined by the late Middle Ages and was dissolved in 1541. It was burnt out by Brian O"Neill in 1572. It was granted to Sir Hugh Montgomery who re-roofed the ...
Founded: 1193 | Location: Greyabbey, United Kingdom

St Brendan's Chapel

St Brendan"s Chapel was built in the late 13th or early 14th century date by Clann Somhairle and was dedicated to St. Brendan. The chapel replaced an earlier chapel dedicated to St. Columba, which had been incorporated into nearby Skipness Castle.
Founded: c. 1300 | Location: Argyll and Bute, United Kingdom

St. Anne's Church

St. Anne's Church is the only Anglican church in Alderney island. Built to the design of the famous English architect Sir George Scott, it is one of the finest Victorian buildings in the Channel Islands. The cost of the building was financed by Reverend Canon John Le Mesurier, son of the last Hereditary Governor of Alderney. Consecrated in 1850 it is part of the Deanery of Guernsey and supervised by the Bishop of Winches ...
Founded: 1850 | Location: Alderney, United Kingdom

Newtownards Priory

Newtownards Priory was a medieval Dominican priory founded by the Savage family around 1244. Only the lower parts of the nave and two blocked doors in the south wall leading to a demolished cloister, survive from the period of the priory"s foundation. The upper parts of the nave date from a 14th-century rebuilding and the western extension and the north aisle arcade were undertaken by the de Burgh family. The pr ...
Founded: 1244 | Location: Newtownards, United Kingdom

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

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Medieval Walls of Avila

The city walls of Avila were built in the 11th century to protect the citizens from the Moors. They have been well maintained throughout the centuries and are now a major tourist attraction as well as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Visitors can walk around about half of the length of the walls.

The layout of the city is an even quadrilateral with a perimeter of 2,516 m. Its walls, which consist in part of stones already used in earlier constructions, have an average thickness of 3 m. Access to the city is afforded by nine gates of different periods; twin 20 m high towers, linked by a semi-circular arch, flank the oldest ones, Puerta de San Vicente and Puerta del Alcázar.