The Mimara Museum is an art museum in the city of Zagreb. Of the total of 3,700 varied works of art, more than 1,500 exhibits constitute permanent holdings, dating from the prehistoric period up to the 20th century. Some of the most famous exhibits include works by Lorenzetti, Giorgione, Veronese, Canaletto, 60 paintings by the Dutch masters Van Goyen, Ruisdael, 50 works by the Flemish masters Van der Weyden, Bosch, Rubens, Van Dyck, more than 30 by the Spanish masters Velázquez, Murillo, Goya, some 20 paintings by the German masters Holbein, Liebermann, Leibl, some 30 paintings by the English painters Gainsborough, Turner, Bonington and more than 120 paintings by the French masters Georges de La Tour, Boucher, Chardin, Delacroix, Corot, Manet, Renoir, Degas. The drawings collection holds some 200 drawings by Bronzino, Guardi, Claude Lorrain, Le Brun, Oudry, Greuze, Géricault, and Friesz. The museum was opened in 1987. The building itself originates from the 19th century, its conversion to a museum overseen by a Zagreb architect Kuno Waidmann; originally it served as a gymnasium.

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Founded: 1987
Category: Museums in Croatia

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en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Reinaldo Gabay (8 months ago)
The best and biggest art Museum in Zagreb, for sure. Currently closed, if you ever come to Zagreb and the Museum is already open again, do not miss this visit. At least half a day (4-5 hours) to walk through all the rooms. It hosts an exhaustive collection of paintings, sculptures, wood carvings and other objects collected by the businessman and philantropist Ante Topić Mimara, who gave the city of Zagreb this wonderful gift. Building resembles a palace of the XVIII - XIX centuries. If you are in a rush, don't come to Mimara: this is a Museum to be enjoyed hall by hall. Meetings also used to be held here in the lobby, but Museum is closed due to repairs since March 2020 earthquake and has not opened yet again. Paintings from european masters can also be found in this collection.
Cristiana Umbelino (12 months ago)
Another of the excelent museums one can/must experience in Zagreb. For museum lovers, like myself and my husband this was a very interesting day. We absolutely recomend it, if you have the time to spend while in Zagreb.
Cristiana Umbelino (12 months ago)
Another of the excelent museums one can/must experience in Zagreb. For museum lovers, like myself and my husband this was a very interesting day. We absolutely recomend it, if you have the time to spend while in Zagreb.
NOStorious S.P.I.D (12 months ago)
Wonderfull place filled with art of all kinds
Eugenia Barrios (14 months ago)
It is close for reparation but I wrote to them a few months ago and they never answer me. The building is beautiful.
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