Mali Tabor Castle

Mali Tabor, Croatia

Mali Tabor Castle was mentioned for the first time at the end of the 15th century. It was then owned by the Ratkay family but its builders are unknown to this day. Between 1490 and 1504 it was owned by the viceroy of Croatia-Hungary John Corvinus. For almost three centuries it was owned by the powerful Hungarian family of Rattkay (1524-1793). In 1972, Ivan Rattkay left the Mali Tabor castle to his nephew, the baron Joseph Wintershoffen, in whose possession it remained until 1818, when it was inherited by Rikard Jelačić from the Zaprešić branch. They owned it until 1876, and from then it was owned by the Irish baron Henry Cavanagh.

In the earliest phase of construction the castle had the shape of a rectangular building with defense walls and four semi-towers. The western wall, is probably the original defense wall of the old Mali Tabor castle.

During the second phase of construction the castle was transformed into a one-storied Baroque palace. It remained in this function until the 19th century. In 1861 a one-storied annex was built in the eastern wing of the castle on the northern side. This was also the time when the northern defense wall of the castle was torn down and a new entrance portal was built. The portal has been preserved to this day. The castle is abandoned for many years today. It is in a bad state and for sale.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Croatia

More Information

www.urbex.nl
www.iarh.hr

Rating

3.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Visit with Vitja (9 months ago)
Ruinous condition
Zdenko Brkanic (10 months ago)
A castle that needs a lot of investment.
Lidija Filipec Stanislav (10 months ago)
A beautiful romantic castle in indescribably poor condition, unforgivable for something that is part of our cultural heritage. Access is possible only from the road, the second is all neglected and overgrown. Roofs and ceilings threaten to collapse. I recommend visiting and looking until everything together becomes just a sad ruin.
treci g (10 months ago)
Big camp is bigger ...
Krznar Siniša (12 months ago)
Formerly probably a beautiful castle but now completely neglected and rugged.
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