St. Clement's Church

Klemensker, Denmark

St. Clement's Church (Klemens Kirke) is a parish church located in the village of Klemensker on the Danish island of Bornholm. Completed in 1882 in the Historicist style, it replaces an earlier Romanesque church from the 14th century or earlier. Today the church is noteworthy for works contributed by the Bornholm artist Paul Høm. Many items of inventory from the old church can now be seen in the Bornholm Museum. The church is named after St. Clement of Rome, Latin: Clemens Romanus, as documented in early references from 1335.

Several runestones have been found in the vicinity. They probably date from the 11th century when a wooden church may have stood on the site. Now standing on the south side of the church, the Lundhøj Stone (found in 1819 as a bridge over a brook) is 2.74 meters tall. There are many other fragments of runestones bearing one or two words, some forming part of the churchyard wall.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1882
Category: Religious sites in Denmark

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Martin Valentin Frederiksen (10 months ago)
Beautiful church
Stefan Granild (12 months ago)
Great paintings. Warm and cozy
Helene Dahlmann (18 months ago)
A beautiful church and good place and people
Karsten Bach (22 months ago)
Beautiful high situated village church from 1882 not seen by the oldest on the island but the buzz of history enriched by several rune stones which are located around the cemetery. The cemetery also looks quite good in winter clothes ❄️??️
bemny lintrup (2 years ago)
Ok
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.