Ruth's Church

Hasle, Denmark

Ruth's Church (Ruts Kirke) was built in the early 13th century in the Romanesque style. Situated on a hilltop 130 m above sea level, it is the island's highest-standing church. The oldest reference to the church dates from 1490 where Sancti Michelssogen (St Michael's Parish) is mentioned. The church was initially consecrated as St Michael's, possibly because of its high location. By 1621, the name had become Ruth's Church after Ruth the Moabite in the Old Testament.

The church was probably built first with a nave and chancel. The tower at the west end and the porch on the south side were added later. The chancel and the finely rounded apsis are part of the original structure. At the end of the 19th century, the north wing was added. The old tower and porch were removed a little later, the nave was lengthened by some 3 metres and a new tower was built.

Constructed in the second half of the 16th century, the bell tower in the churchyard is said to be the oldest on the island. It has not, however, been used since 1886 when the bells were transferred to the new tower at the west end of the church.

In 1908, frescoes were discovered in the late Gothic apsis vaults. Depicting the signs of the evangelists, they were restored in 1930. Next to the fresco of Matthew, the date 1559 can be seen. Also of interest is the granite Romanesque font which is almost cylindrical in shape.

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Address

Kirkevej 1, Hasle, Denmark
See all sites in Hasle

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Denmark
Historical period: The First Kingdom (Denmark)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

kristian mogensen (5 months ago)
Jens Pihl (5 months ago)
En meget flot gammel kirke bygget i traditionel form men har et specielt smukt klokketårn. Med bindingsværk fra oven kirken er placeret på en af de højeste punkter på Bornholm og der er en pragtfuld udsigt udenfor på kirkepladsen og i terrænet rundt om kirken Det er godt sted at være og Det anbefales at besøge stedet
ian Laeborg (7 months ago)
Her var danmarks højest beliggende prædikestol.. Smuk kirke med god udsigt. Over området og havet . Et besøg værd
Bjarne Jacobsen (2 years ago)
Fin og velholdt kirke.
Miros Siemieniuk (2 years ago)
Typowy szwedzko - norweski styl, surowy, zimno w środku, mało wiernych/. Ale ta prostota urzeka.
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