Västra Hoby Church

Lund, Sweden

Västra Hoby Church was built in 1886 since most of the previous church had been demolished. The old church was built in the Middle Ages, but of that church there is only the tower left. On a wall in the back of the church room there is a reredos from the 15th century. It was stored in the Museum of cultural history in Lund, but has now been moved back to Västra Hoby Church. The reredos is divided into 19 fields. The first nine fields show the childhood of Jesus. The tenth field is much larger than the others and show the crucifixion of Jesus. The last nine fields show the Story of the Passion.

The font was made in the Middle Ages. The altarpiece is a copy of a Carl Bloch-painting made in 1886 by Hjalmar Berggren. The present church organ was moved from Odarslöv Church in 2004 and was consecrated on November 14. It has 528 pipes and was made by Eskil Lundin in 1904, which is a quite high age for a church organ still in use. The parish thought it was a shame not to use the old organ, so they wanted to move the organ when Odarslöv Church was deconsecrated in 2002.

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Details

Founded: 1886
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Union with Norway and Modernization (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carina Åkesson (4 years ago)
En söt liten fin kyrka fin omgivning
Per-Olov Lundgren (4 years ago)
Ett vackert kyrkorum.
Jonny och Ann-Christine Andersson (4 years ago)
Kyrkan är ganska modern med sina bara drygt 130 år men byn omkring den är en historiskt intressant plats eftersom den sannolikt var ett tillhåll för danska bevakningsstyrkor under tiden före Slaget vid Lund 1676. Natten till den 13 november 1676 rullade svenskt artilleri fram kanoner till Kävlingeån och sköt mot byn med glödgade kanonkulor. Bönderna drabbades förstås värst och större delen av byn brann ned, bl.a. prästgården.
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