Mõdriku estate (Mödders) was first mentioned in 1470. Over the centuries, it has been the property of various Baltic German families. During the 20th century, it has been used by various schools. The building traces its oldest parts to the 17th century, but has been extensively enlarged and rebuilt both during the 1780's and 1890's.

The manor was the home of several successive generations of the von Kaulbars family, including Russian general and explorer Alexander Kaulbars. An ancestor to him, R. A. von Kaulbars (reputedly a great patriot) put up the column commemorating the French-Russian War of 1812 that is still visible in the manor park.

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Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mati Murrik (2 months ago)
Ilus mõis @nowhereland
Eneli Paris (16 months ago)
Beautiful to the eye.
Epp Kiik (18 months ago)
Manor complex in a very beautiful condition.
Juri Raudsepp (2 years ago)
Branch of Tallinn Technical School ... in the old days ili Mõdriky Technical School.
Tarmo Juus (4 years ago)
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