Tallinn's most famous cemetery Metsakalmistu was officially opened in 1939. Among its most famous permanent guests are Estonia’s presidents Konstantin Päts and Lennart Meri, writers Lydia Koidula and Anton-Hansen Tammsaare, chess player Paul Keres, composer Raimond Valgre and singer Georg Ots. Even if you don't visit these celebrity graves, a stroll through the rest of the cemetery is still a fascinating and peaceful experience. Take bus N°34A or 38 to the Metsakalmistu or Pärnamäe stops.

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User Reviews

Annemarie Feld (2 years ago)
Kalmistul on prügikonteinerid tihedalt on kaevud,wc parklas ja lillede müük
Jyrki Peltonen (3 years ago)
Rauhallinen hautausmaa mäntymetsässä Pirita-joen läheisyydessä.
Alessandro Nessenzia (4 years ago)
Vasta pineta adibita a cimitero con viali prevalentemente sterrati che la percorrono. Le tombe sono dislocate in ordine sparso fra gli alberi. Dall'accesso principale si passa vicino ad una cappella dove è posizionata anche una mappa del cimitero che indica le sepolture dei personaggi più famosi. La fermata dell'autobus è vicina all'entrata principale.
Ants Veeme (4 years ago)
Kuulsaimad eestlased on siia maetud
Hugo Vaino (7 years ago)
Butiful
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