Tallinn's most famous cemetery Metsakalmistu was officially opened in 1939. Among its most famous permanent guests are Estonia’s presidents Konstantin Päts and Lennart Meri, writers Lydia Koidula and Anton-Hansen Tammsaare, chess player Paul Keres, composer Raimond Valgre and singer Georg Ots. Even if you don't visit these celebrity graves, a stroll through the rest of the cemetery is still a fascinating and peaceful experience. Take bus N°34A or 38 to the Metsakalmistu or Pärnamäe stops.

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User Reviews

Annemarie Feld (9 months ago)
Kalmistul on prügikonteinerid tihedalt on kaevud,wc parklas ja lillede müük
Jyrki Peltonen (2 years ago)
Rauhallinen hautausmaa mäntymetsässä Pirita-joen läheisyydessä.
Alessandro Nessenzia (3 years ago)
Vasta pineta adibita a cimitero con viali prevalentemente sterrati che la percorrono. Le tombe sono dislocate in ordine sparso fra gli alberi. Dall'accesso principale si passa vicino ad una cappella dove è posizionata anche una mappa del cimitero che indica le sepolture dei personaggi più famosi. La fermata dell'autobus è vicina all'entrata principale.
Ants Veeme (3 years ago)
Kuulsaimad eestlased on siia maetud
Hugo Vaino (6 years ago)
Butiful
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Goseck Circle

The Goseck circle is a Neolithic circle structure. It may be the oldest and best known of the Circular Enclosures associated with the Central European Neolithic. It also may be one of the oldest Solar observatories in the world. It consists of a set of concentric ditches 75 metres across and two palisade rings containing gates in places aligned with sunrise and sunset on the solstice days.

Its construction is dated to c. 4900 BC, and it seems to have remained in use until 4600 BC. This corresponds to the transitional phase between the Neolithic Linear Pottery and Stroke-ornamented ware cultures. It is one of a larger group of so-called Circular Enclosures in the Elbe and Danube region, most of which show similar alignments.

Excavators also found the remains of what may have been ritual fires, animal and human bones, and a headless skeleton near the southeastern gate, that could be interpreted as traces of human sacrifice or specific burial ritual. There is no sign of fire or of other destruction, so why the site was abandoned is unknown. Later villagers built a defensive moat following the ditches of the old enclosure.

The Goseck ring is one of the best preserved and extensively investigated of the many similar structures built at around the same time. Traces of the original configuration reveal that the Goseck ring consisted of four concentric circles, a mound, a ditch, and two wooden palisades. The palisades had three sets of gates facing southeast, southwest, and north. At the winter solstice, observers at the center would have seen the sun rise and set through the southeast and southwest gates.

Archaeologists generally agree that Goseck circle was used for observation of the course of the Sun in the course of the solar year. Together with calendar calculations, it allowed coordinating an easily judged lunar calendar with the more demanding measurements of a solar calendar.