Tallinn City Museum

Tallinn, Estonia

The building of the City Museum dates from the 14th century. The oldest record in the real estate register dates from 1363. The permanent exhibition provides an overlook of Tallinn’s history through centuries – beginning with prehistory and ending with Estonia’s regaining of independence in 1991.

Various sectors of medieval society are explained using a combination of texts, artefacts, life-sized models and sound effects. High-quality displays on the upper floors are devoted to 20th-century life, its turbulent wars, Soviet occupation, and finally Estonian independence.

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Address

Vene 17, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1363
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marie Laure Dut (2 years ago)
I discovered the history of the city. A good museum for children. Playful museum and at the same time rich of history
Rémi Ninon (2 years ago)
Nice museum in Tallinn. Really interesting sections with different topics like the history of Tallinn at medieval times or the way they got their independance from the ex URSS with historical videos. If you have some time ahead of you while visiting, you should stop there, there's a lot to learn :)
Candy S (2 years ago)
Very nice museum, all the staffs are nice, helpful and informative. Worth to visit.
Oana Sucigan (2 years ago)
Awesome museum. The lady at the entrance was very nice and passionate about the city's history
George On tour (2 years ago)
We introduce the history of the city from its establishment to this day. The cellars of the medieval merchant house stores ceramics, porcelain, and metal. The top floors host exhibitions on the history of the city. The rococo style party room introduced the luxury items and portraits of aldermen and wealthy townspeople. The annual exhibition 'One Hundred Years of Daily Life' introduces the century in terms of everyday life and shows how life and the city have changed. When booked beforehand, we organise tours in Estonian, Russian, English, Finnish, and German. Tallinn City Museum opened the first virtual exhibition in Estonia on the Google Arts & Culture platform, allowing users to explore the museum.
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