Swedish St. Michael's Church

Tallinn, Estonia

This small church on Rüütli street has been the spiritual home for generations of Estonian Swedes, an ethnic group that's been present in Tallinn since the Middle Ages. The location had originally been an almshouse for the city's poor, but in 1733 the tsarist government gave it to the Swedish congregation, which been left without its own church since the Great Northern War.

During Soviet times the building was converted into a sports hall and fell into disrepair, but was renovated and reconsecrated in 2002. It now has a congregation of around 200, and continues to hold services in Swedish. In addition to its Baroque altar by Joachim Armbrust and a Baroque pulpit, the church has a unique baptistery created by famed sculptor Christian Ackermann in 1680.

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Address

Rüütli 9, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1733
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matthias Bolliger (4 years ago)
Calmly beautiful, light and quiet church.
Robert Hellrand (5 years ago)
Quaint and lovely in particular around christmas
Stellan Ahvander (5 years ago)
Very nice church and priest.
Per Salmelin (5 years ago)
An interesting historical church and a meetingplace for many interesting people
showjumper2308 (5 years ago)
Beautiful church, cool artwork. You would never expect such a nice place from the outside. Guard is super nice and loves to tell you about the church's history. Definitely recommend!
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