Swedish St. Michael's Church

Tallinn, Estonia

This small church on Rüütli street has been the spiritual home for generations of Estonian Swedes, an ethnic group that's been present in Tallinn since the Middle Ages. The location had originally been an almshouse for the city's poor, but in 1733 the tsarist government gave it to the Swedish congregation, which been left without its own church since the Great Northern War.

During Soviet times the building was converted into a sports hall and fell into disrepair, but was renovated and reconsecrated in 2002. It now has a congregation of around 200, and continues to hold services in Swedish. In addition to its Baroque altar by Joachim Armbrust and a Baroque pulpit, the church has a unique baptistery created by famed sculptor Christian Ackermann in 1680.

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Address

Rüütli 9, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1733
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aleksandr Boltyshev (2 years ago)
Шведская церковь Святого Михаила (эст. Rootsi-Mihkli kirik, швед. Svenska S:t Mikaelskyrkan) — церковь, находящаяся в историческом центре Таллина, улица Рюйтли, д. 9. Памятник средневековой архитектуры. В настоящее время принадлежит лютеранскому приходу, входящему в ЭЕЛЦ. История В 1249 году в Таллине был основан женский монастырь ордена цистерцианцев. В конце XIV или начале XV века монастырская капелла Святого Венцеля была основательно расширена. В 1631 году имущество (в том числе строения) монастыря были секуляризированы: в части зданий расположилась мужская гимназия (ныне — гимназия Густава Адольфа), в другой части — типография, а церковь стала собственностью шведского гарнизона. В 1716 году по приказу Меншикова церковь была реорганизована в русскую гарнизонную церковь (в 1732 году освящена как православная Преображенская церковь). Шведы были вынуждены собираться в другом здании — в госпитале иоаннитов. Но и это здание у шведов отобрали после Второй мировой войны — здесь расположилась спортшкола. После визита в 1992 году в Эстонию короля Швеции здание вновь передали Церкви. В 2002 году отремонтированное и реконструированное здание было освящено.
Nadine G (3 years ago)
Very old historical place in the heart of Vanalinn. Worth taking a shall if intended to stay for longer. Cold in winter, but makes you feel like 300 years old times.
Jeremy Swartz (3 years ago)
Beautiful church located in Old Town. It is another church that had been well preserved.
Kirill Ivanov (4 years ago)
Super
Federico Robello (4 years ago)
Nice place to sightseeing going in the center direction
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