Löberöd Castle

Löberöd, Sweden

The early history of Löberöd estate is unknown, but the oldest parts were built in the 1620s. Then the owner was Anna Brahe. Her nephew, a member of the Ramel family, inherited Löberöd when Anne, a childless widow, passed away in 1635. The manor was in the possession of the Ramel family until 1799. The northern wing and the eight-sided turret were built in 1798-1799. About twenty years later an orangery was added and an English park was laid out.

The surrounding marshes were drained, resulting in a small lake. In 1863 the manor returned to the Ramels when a member of the family bought it in 1863, only to sell it in 1917. But 80 years later, in 1997, the property was transferred back to the family for a third time. In 1982 the main building was ravaged by fire which destroyed the roof. A complete renovation was undertaken in 1999 and 2000. The house and grounds are not open to the public.

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Address

1119, Löberöd, Sweden
See all sites in Löberöd

Details

Founded: 1798-1799
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: The Age of Enlightenment (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.eslov.se

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elna Ljung (2 years ago)
Mysig julmarknad
Henrik Jensen (2 years ago)
Cecilia Stockmab (2 years ago)
De vore trevligt att få besöka denna plats jag är intresserad av gamla bruks konst och samlar själv vill veta mer cd
Linus Carlsson (4 years ago)
Trevligt
Johan Windh (4 years ago)
Very nice annual Christmas Market with various art and design stands.
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