Pålsjö Castle was built in the late 1670s and the French style park dates from the 1760s. The first known owner was Sten Torbensen Bille, who died in 1520. The estate was destroyed in the Scanian war (1676–1679) and rebuilt soon after by Magnus Paulin, the Mayor of Helsingborg. During the Helsingborg battle in the Great Northern War (1700-1721) Earl Magnus Stenbock had his headquarters in Pålsjö Castle The current appearance originates from the restoration made by Danish architect Christian Abraham in 1873.

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Details

Founded: 1676-1679
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefan Alsnäs (2 years ago)
Lätt att hitta, bra parkering. Besökte Frogner Heart. Väl mottagen. Verkade väldigt kompetenta. Fina lokaler.
Mads Hansson (2 years ago)
Perfekt för utflykt, skogspromenad, en tur på landborgspromenaden och kanske grilla lite.
Ali Barakat (2 years ago)
Love this place, great nature also nice at summer to go out with the children.
Cecilia Stockmab (2 years ago)
Påsjöslott vackert beläget natur skönt populärt utflyksmål för många barnfamiljer och äldre för en promenad med hund. Cs
Elena Sofia Ferrari (2 years ago)
Nice place to enjoy a relaxing afternoon
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