Hällestad Church

Torna-hällestad, Sweden

Hällestad church was built of stone in the 12th century. It was enlarged in the 15th century and the tower was erected probably in the late Middle Ages. The church was restored and enlarged in the mid-1800s.

There are mural paintings from the 1400s in the vaults, made by so-called “Vittskövle Master”. Three Viking age runestones are located to the eastern wall outside the church.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stefan Håkansson (3 years ago)
Torna Hällestad's church was built in the 1450s and is strategically located on a hill. The solid masonry testifies that the building was also used as a fortification during times of unrest. Perhaps the most interesting thing about the exterior is the three rune stones that were walled into the walls in the 19th century. Until then, they stood in the cemetery. The stones are being tested in memory of Toke Gormson, who may have been related to the Danish king Gorm.
Giorgio Berardi (3 years ago)
Hällestad Church is really a jewel. A pity that the original church from the 11th century went the way of most of the buildings from the era, with subsequent destructions always lurking either because of materials or religious strife. Though hidden away in a hamlet with less than 1000 inhabitants, it is well worth a detour. The church's vaulted ceiling is decorated by lovely frescoes, and an additional curiosity about Hällestad church is to be found on its outer walls, which have three 11th century runic stones inlaid.
Alf Engdahl (4 years ago)
A wonderfully beautiful and well-kept church. Host a great detour
Acki Salomonsson (4 years ago)
My church ... small nice with nice ceiling paintings where I find / get the calm.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Topography of Terror

The Topography of Terror (Topographie des Terrors) is an outdoor and indoor history museum. It is located on Niederkirchnerstrasse, formerly Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, on the site of buildings which during the Nazi regime from 1933 to 1945 were the headquarters of the Gestapo and the SS, the principal instruments of repression during the Nazi era.

The buildings that housed the Gestapo and SS headquarters were largely destroyed by Allied bombing during early 1945 and the ruins demolished after the war. The boundary between the American and Soviet zones of occupation in Berlin ran along the Prinz-Albrecht-Strasse, so the street soon became a fortified boundary, and the Berlin Wall ran along the south side of the street, renamed Niederkirchnerstrasse, from 1961 to 1989. The wall here was never demolished.