Carthusian Church Monastery

Kartuzy, Poland

Built in 1380, the amazing Gothic church originally featured a simple shingle roof, which was changed into its now notorious coffin-shaped lead sheet iron form in the 1730s. The church and surrounding ensemble of buildings were once home to a small group of Carthusian monks from Bohemia, a peculiar brotherhood who favoured among other eccentricities a Trappist lifestyle and sleeping in coffins. Inside, find a rich collection of Baroque altars, 29 elaborately carved wooden seats for the monks, a large collection of 17th-century religious paintings and the famous clock pendulum on which hangs a white angel swinging a scythe, accompanied by the eerie words ‘each passing seconds brings you closer to your death’. The church is considered by many to be one of the most interesting religious buildings in Europe and is an absolute must-see and includes a cafe where you can watch a film about Kartuzy.

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Address

Klasztorna 5, Kartuzy, Poland
See all sites in Kartuzy

Details

Founded: 1380
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

www.inyourpocket.com

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

EMILIA BARTCZAK (3 years ago)
Anioł śmierci nad drzwiami ...
Aleksander Kukułka (3 years ago)
Piekne niejsce.napewno warto dołoźyć kilka kilometrów źeby zwiedzić to miejsce
Rodi Lualaba (3 years ago)
Przepiękna Kolegiata. Blisko jezioro . Uliczka przy kościele klimatyczna. Lubię tam zaglądać . Dach w kształcie wieka trumny .
ArtFoto Film (3 years ago)
Memento mori
Aneta Lange (4 years ago)
Memento mori
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