Kastellet is one of the best preserved star fortresses in Northern Europe. It is constructed in the form of a pentagram with bastions at its corners. Kastellet was continuous with the ring of bastioned ramparts which used to encircle Copenhagen but of which only the ramparts of Christianshavn remain today.

King Christian IV of Denmark initiated Kastellet’s construction in 1626 with the building of an advanced post, the Sankt Annæ Skanse (St. Anne's Redoubt), on the coast north of the city. The redoubt guarded the entrance to the port, together with a blockhouse that was constructed north of Christianshavn, which had just been founded on the other side of the strait between Zealand and Amager. At that time the fortifications only reached as far north as present day Nørreport station, and then returned south east to meet the coast at Bremerholm, the Royal Shipyard. However, part of the king's plan was to expand the area of the fortified city by abandoning the old East Rampart and instead extend the rampart straight north to connect it to Sankt Annæ Skanse. This plan was not completed until the mid-1640s, shortly after King Frederick III succeeded King Christian IV.

After the Swedish siege on Copenhagen (1658–1660) the Dutch engineer Henrik Rüse was called in to help rebuild and extend the construction. The fortification was named Citadellet Frederikshavn ('The Frederikshavn Citadel'), but it is better known as Kastellet ('the citadel').

Kastellet was part of the defense of Copenhagen against England in the Battle of Copenhagen (1807). During the German invasion of Denmark on 9 April 1940, German troops landing at the nearby harbor captured The Citadel with very little resistance, thereby forcing the Danish government to surrender.

Kastellet was renovated 1989–1999 with funds from the A.P. Møller and Wife Chastine McKinney Møllers General Fund.

A number of buildings are located within the grounds of Kastellet, including a church as well as a windmill. The area houses various military activities but its mainly serves as a public park and a historic site.

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Details

Founded: 1626
Category: Castles and fortifications in Denmark
Historical period: Early Modern Denmark (Denmark)

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Waleed Maza (6 months ago)
Beautiful place
Linus G. (7 months ago)
Nice place to take a look at but nothing too special!
Cezar Neculae (7 months ago)
Very interesting star-shaped fortress, built with earth protection walls. Free entrance, it closes at 22.00. Construction in progress on the main road inside until 2021.
Joe Hyde (8 months ago)
This 17th century star shaped fortress is very cool to wonder around, entry was free. Everything is so well maintained and all the plant and trees are so luscious and green. Would definitely pop in if you are passing by.
Nirmala Sarathchandra (11 months ago)
It seems an old fortress surrounded by water. It is maintained very well and I think it is a good place to add to your travel plan. Entrance is (was) free of charge. You can see old and nice buildings, some old canons and specially an old windmill - a must visit place and many attractions. Overall, it is a clean and tidy place.
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