Montivilliers Abbey

Montivilliers, France

The Abbey Church of Notre-Dame, sometimes referred to as 'Montivilliers Abbey' dates back to 684, although it was destroyed a Viking raid in 850, and rebuilt as a church in both the Romanesque and Gothic styles. It fell into decline by the late 1700's. Its decline went up to the French revolution at the end of the 18th century when it was closed and sold. Fortunately the abbey was not destroyed and was later bought back by the city of Montivilliers. An ambitious restoration program which was completed in 2000 gave back to the abbey its splendor.

Besides the church, it now houses exhibition rooms and the cloister has regained its elegance. The plan of the abbey is a traditional one: western building mass with two towers, large un-vaulted nave, projecting transept, lantern tower and gradated tower. The older parts are located in the choir and in the base of the western mass which dates from the end of the 11th century.From the renovated refectory to the rebuilt cloisters, and from the chapter house to the dormitory, as part of a moving museum exhibit that vibrantly evokes the nuns' lives, the abbey's history and its architecture.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.abbaye-montivilliers.fr

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

track music (6 months ago)
Sympa petite église mais peu de travaux on sent le vieux et le délaissé.
nadine danjou (6 months ago)
Enfin je l ais visité .... Magnifique
Mohamed Miraoui (6 months ago)
J aime ce lieu son architecture
Chantal DUCROS (7 months ago)
Très belle abbaye, accueillant souvent des expositions. A visiter
Nicolas GAELLE (7 months ago)
La visite de ce lieu mérite vraiment d'être faite. Je n'aurais jamais cru avant d'y pénétrer que cette bâtisse était si ancienne et son histoire si riche. Dès le début, vous pourrez admirer le jardin intérieur avant de débuter la visite. Cette dernière est composée d'une multitude de maquettes, animations, projections, peintures et bien plus encore. A visiter à tout prix !
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