Montivilliers Abbey

Montivilliers, France

The Abbey Church of Notre-Dame, sometimes referred to as 'Montivilliers Abbey' dates back to 684, although it was destroyed a Viking raid in 850, and rebuilt as a church in both the Romanesque and Gothic styles. It fell into decline by the late 1700's. Its decline went up to the French revolution at the end of the 18th century when it was closed and sold. Fortunately the abbey was not destroyed and was later bought back by the city of Montivilliers. An ambitious restoration program which was completed in 2000 gave back to the abbey its splendor.

Besides the church, it now houses exhibition rooms and the cloister has regained its elegance. The plan of the abbey is a traditional one: western building mass with two towers, large un-vaulted nave, projecting transept, lantern tower and gradated tower. The older parts are located in the choir and in the base of the western mass which dates from the end of the 11th century.From the renovated refectory to the rebuilt cloisters, and from the chapter house to the dormitory, as part of a moving museum exhibit that vibrantly evokes the nuns' lives, the abbey's history and its architecture.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.abbaye-montivilliers.fr

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joël Duchesne (6 months ago)
C'est un endroit que l'on se doit de visiter..
Jean-Yves Palfray (11 months ago)
The Montivilliers Abbey is a former Benedictine women's monastery, founded at the end of the 7th century by Saint Philibert, founder of Jumièges. Destroyed by the Vikings in the 9th century, it was relieved by Richard II of Normandy who then placed it under the dependence of the Abbey of Fécamp. If the original structure of the abbey church is Romanesque, the nave and the large porch are in flamboyant Gothic style. There is also a very beautiful cloister, reconstructed in the 19th century. A beautiful place to visit, which can be completed by discovering the aitre of Brisgaret located a few streets away. It is an old medieval cemetery having retained its original vocation, which notably has a remarkable gallery-ossuary whose wall is decorated with macabre carved representations.
Fred (2 years ago)
Extra
Andrew Hall (2 years ago)
Shut
Ricardo Ricardo (2 years ago)
The church needs investment to restore it
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