Graville Abbey

Le Havre, France

The first mention of Graville Abbey was in the 9th century. Considered to be a masterpiece of the Romanesque art in Normandy, the abbey underwent several periods of construction since the 11th century. The church's nave and transept date from the Romanesque period. Guillaume Malet de Graville, who was victorious during the Hastings battle alongside William the Conqueror, as well as his descendants, invested their fortune in preserving the riches of this monument. Today conventual buildings are converted to a museum.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jabar Singh (15 months ago)
A must visit at le havre. History buffs will love it. Good scenic beauty.
Lexi Donne (2 years ago)
Great abbaye and wonderful docents. Lots of history and amazing stories.
Steve Jàcobs (4 years ago)
Great gardens and buildings, excellent spot for a picnic.
Lynette M. (4 years ago)
Nice place to visit while in Normandy
Nahid Siraj (5 years ago)
Peacefulness over there
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