Fort de la Conchée

Saint-Malo, France

Fort de la Conchée is an island fortification constructed by Sebastien Vauban. In 1689 Vauban conducted an inspections of French coastal fortifications for King Louis XIV, who wished to strengthen and improve the country's defences. In 1693 whilst the fort was being constructed the English raided the town. They landed on Conchée where they slighted the works and captured those working on the fort.

Again in 1695 the English, with their Dutch allies, attacked the fortress. Though the fort was unfinished, ten guns had been installed, which permitted the French to repulse the attack. The battery then turned its guns on the main attacking fleet causing much damage to it. The fort was finally finished in 1705. The fortress was demilitarised in 1901.

During the Second World war the Germans used the abandoned fort for target practice. The Allies then attacked the fort during St Malo's liberation.

The fort covers almost the entire island. The fortress consists of a granite two-storey structure, with an upper terrace for the fort's armament.

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Saint-Malo, France
See all sites in Saint-Malo

Details

Founded: 1689-1705
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philippe Mesny (2 years ago)
Visite passionnante, restauration remarquable pilotée par des amoureux de ce bijou patrimonial.
djelloul stmalo (2 years ago)
Super lieu bravo pour la restauration de cette merveille merci aux bénévoles
Bull Bull (2 years ago)
Quel travail ⚒ effectuer
Franck C (2 years ago)
Euh... Ne venez pas tous en même temps... Il y a trop de monde à St Malo l'été ! Nous, on est à côté, on est contents d'en profiter toute l'année ! Mais vous êtes les bienvenus dans toute la Bretagne, et il n'y a pas que les côtes, c'est le plus beau pays du monde ! Degemer mat !
Fernand Naudin (3 years ago)
Superbe. Et bravo aux courageux membres de l'association qui restaure ce Fort de Vauban historique !
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