Fort de la Conchée

Saint-Malo, France

Fort de la Conchée is an island fortification constructed by Sebastien Vauban. In 1689 Vauban conducted an inspections of French coastal fortifications for King Louis XIV, who wished to strengthen and improve the country's defences. In 1693 whilst the fort was being constructed the English raided the town. They landed on Conchée where they slighted the works and captured those working on the fort.

Again in 1695 the English, with their Dutch allies, attacked the fortress. Though the fort was unfinished, ten guns had been installed, which permitted the French to repulse the attack. The battery then turned its guns on the main attacking fleet causing much damage to it. The fort was finally finished in 1705. The fortress was demilitarised in 1901.

During the Second World war the Germans used the abandoned fort for target practice. The Allies then attacked the fort during St Malo's liberation.

The fort covers almost the entire island. The fortress consists of a granite two-storey structure, with an upper terrace for the fort's armament.

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Saint-Malo, France
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Details

Founded: 1689-1705
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fred TRINQUIER (2 months ago)
Vauban's jewel Magical
Michel (17 months ago)
50 mn by kayak from St Malo.
Benjamin (2 years ago)
Magnificent work of our heritage. Thanks to the volunteers!
sylvie bretille (2 years ago)
Bravo for this beautiful restoration
Pierrick Legay (3 years ago)
Very good to visit. Well received. Guide well
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