The National Museum of Finland

Helsinki, Finland

The National Museum of Finland presents Finnish history from the Stone Age to the present day, through objects and cultural history. The permanent exhibitions of the National Museum are divided into six parts. The Treasure Troves presents the collections of coins, medals, orders and decorations, silver, jewellery and weapons. Prehistory of Finland is the largest permanent archeological exhibition in Finland. The Realm presents of the development of Finnish society and culture from the Middle Ages 12th century to the early 20th century, through the Swedish Kingdom Period to the Russian Empire Era. The "Land and Its People" presents Finnish folk culture in the 18th and 19th centuries, life in the countryside before the industrialisation.

Workshop Vintti - Easy History, is an interactive exhibition, where visitors can study the history of Finland and its culture using their hands and brains. It is based on experimentation and personal experience, and the tasks and assignments also point the way to exploring the permanent exhibitions of the museum.

The museum's entrance hall ceiling has ceiling frescoes in the national epic Kalevala theme, painted by Akseli Gallén-Kallela, which can be seen without an entrance fee. The frescoes, painted in 1928, are based on the frescoes painted by Gallén-Kallela in the Finnish Pavilion of the Paris World Fair in 1900.

The building of the National Museum was designed by architects Herman Gesellius, Armas Lindgren, and Eliel Saarinen. The appearance of the building reflects Finland's medieval churches and castles. The architecture belongs to national romanticism and the interior mainly to art nouveau. The museum was built from 1905 to 1910 and opened to the public in 1916. The museum was named the Finnish National Museum after Finland's independence in 1917.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1905-1910
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bogdan Olteanu (15 months ago)
The National Museum of Finland is one of the most organized and interactive museums of this kind that I have visited in Europe, with a precise and truthful storyline from the prehistoric age to current days. It is very interesting to see an unbiased exhibition, showcasing both the boom periods and the downturns, including the natural, political or economic reasons that lead to them. The museum has different interactive areas, with up-to-date technologies. I highly recommend a visit during the stay in Helsinki.
Cem Ertem (2 years ago)
Loved it. An interactive museum experience about finish culture and history. Nice building, helpful staff. More than 2 hours should be spend on. Worth its admission cost.
Nenuphar Blanc (2 years ago)
Beautiful and historical building in the centre of Helsinki. Great way to get a comprehensive review for Finnish history in a few hours. Nice cafe. Interesting changing exhibitions too.
Joyce Tang (2 years ago)
Admission to the museum is: Adults - 12 €, Reduced (student, seniors) - 9 € but admission is free every Friday from 4-6pm. As expected, this museum is filled with all things Finnish, and a good way to pass the time while learning something about this fabulous country. I suspect part of the museum has recently been refurbished as there is quite a strong paint smell. The museum is interactive, encouraging you to actively engage in the exhibits. See the making of the Karuselli Chair, discover how significant and important the sauna is to this country, and the famed cardboard box for newborns. One of my favourite parts of the museum was the wall of past Finnish presidents - take a closer look at them and you'll be in for a surprise!
Shaun Theobald (2 years ago)
Fantastic museum. Staff incredibly polite and helpful. Really enjoyed the re-modelled prehistory gallery. Coffee and cafe superb! Will be returning when next in Helsinki.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the second finest in the country, which includes Titian's last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes.

UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.