The National Museum of Finland

Helsinki, Finland

The National Museum of Finland presents Finnish history from the Stone Age to the present day, through objects and cultural history. The permanent exhibitions of the National Museum are divided into six parts. The Treasure Troves presents the collections of coins, medals, orders and decorations, silver, jewellery and weapons. Prehistory of Finland is the largest permanent archeological exhibition in Finland. The Realm presents of the development of Finnish society and culture from the Middle Ages 12th century to the early 20th century, through the Swedish Kingdom Period to the Russian Empire Era. The "Land and Its People" presents Finnish folk culture in the 18th and 19th centuries, life in the countryside before the industrialisation.

Workshop Vintti - Easy History, is an interactive exhibition, where visitors can study the history of Finland and its culture using their hands and brains. It is based on experimentation and personal experience, and the tasks and assignments also point the way to exploring the permanent exhibitions of the museum.

The museum's entrance hall ceiling has ceiling frescoes in the national epic Kalevala theme, painted by Akseli Gallén-Kallela, which can be seen without an entrance fee. The frescoes, painted in 1928, are based on the frescoes painted by Gallén-Kallela in the Finnish Pavilion of the Paris World Fair in 1900.

The building of the National Museum was designed by architects Herman Gesellius, Armas Lindgren, and Eliel Saarinen. The appearance of the building reflects Finland's medieval churches and castles. The architecture belongs to national romanticism and the interior mainly to art nouveau. The museum was built from 1905 to 1910 and opened to the public in 1916. The museum was named the Finnish National Museum after Finland's independence in 1917.

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Details

Founded: 1905-1910
Category: Museums in Finland
Historical period: Russian Grand Duchy (Finland)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hersh (6 months ago)
The moomin exhibit was good. I'd have loved to see more about the TV series that I used to watch as a child. However, I saw many kids enjoying the place.
pooja mansha (8 months ago)
We love visiting the museum aswell as the season exhibits are very interesting
Sisu Brothers (8 months ago)
Very safe to visit with your family!The Moomin exhibition was wonderful! The museum shop is very nice indeed!Got a wonderful Moomin tote bag!
F Zein (8 months ago)
The information were great. The layout was awesome
Simon Weppel (11 months ago)
A fun exhibition showing Finnish identity and history. Interactive exhibits, and still educational. I enjoyed it. Historic building.
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