St. George of the Latins Church Ruins

Famagusta, Cyprus

St George of the Latins is the remains of one of the earliest churches in Famagusta. The exact date of construction is unknown, but evidence of a crenellated parapet where defenders could protect the church, hints that it was built at a time when the Lusignans had not yet completed the city walls. Its design was supposedly inspired by St. Chapelle church in Paris, which was built in 1241. Generally, it is thought that the church was built in the last quarter of the 13th century, using material removed from the Salamis ruins.

The major part of what remains are the northern and eastern wall. However, these remains allow us to imagine what the edifice must have looked like. The only entrance which survives is to the north, and this is comparatively well preserved. It is surrounded by carvings, and nearby you can see a bearded man wearing monks robes, and a lion attacking a lamb. On top of the piers there were marble gargoyles to take the rainwater off the roof.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

More Information

www.whatson-northcyprus.com

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User Reviews

Yunus Emre Korkusuz (2 months ago)
Like almost all historical artifacts in the TRNC, it is neglected and abandoned to its own fate. It is a Gothic-style church built at the end of the 13th century.
Valentin Burblis (3 months ago)
Apparently the building was beautiful.
MG MG (13 months ago)
Opposite the castle stands the huge ruin of the Latin church of St. George's is a perfect example of early Gothic. Today, unfortunately, only the outline is visible.
Ian Fergusson-Sharp (4 years ago)
St George of the Latins is the remains of one of the earliest churches in Famagusta. It can be found in the northern part of the old city, close to Othello's tower. The exact date of construction is a little vague, but evidence of a crenellated parapet where defenders could protect the church, hints that it was built at a time when the Lusignans had not yet completed the city walls. Its design was supposedly inspired by St Chapelle church in Paris, which was built in 1241. Generally, it is thought that the church was built in the last quarter of the 13th century, using material removed from the Salamis ruins. From inside the church, have a look towards the south west corner. Here you will see the first steps of what was a spiral staircase leading up to the roof. Looking to the north west, you can see the remnants of a guard house with a conical roof and the entrance doorway still visible. Following the line of the roof, you can still see some of the protective wall, complete with arrow slots. It is partially because of these that it is felt that the church was built in the period before the city walls were completed. However, the city walls did not provide complete protection. In common with all the tall buildings in the city, the church suffered damage during the Ottoman siege of 1570, and some of this damage can still be seen on the eastern wall of the church.
Hugo ńĆejka (5 years ago)
Awesome!
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