St. George of the Latins Church Ruins

Famagusta, Cyprus

St George of the Latins is the remains of one of the earliest churches in Famagusta. The exact date of construction is unknown, but evidence of a crenellated parapet where defenders could protect the church, hints that it was built at a time when the Lusignans had not yet completed the city walls. Its design was supposedly inspired by St. Chapelle church in Paris, which was built in 1241. Generally, it is thought that the church was built in the last quarter of the 13th century, using material removed from the Salamis ruins.

The major part of what remains are the northern and eastern wall. However, these remains allow us to imagine what the edifice must have looked like. The only entrance which survives is to the north, and this is comparatively well preserved. It is surrounded by carvings, and nearby you can see a bearded man wearing monks robes, and a lion attacking a lamb. On top of the piers there were marble gargoyles to take the rainwater off the roof.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Cyprus

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www.whatson-northcyprus.com

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