Othello Castle was originally built as a moated citadel by the House of Lusignan in the 14th century to protect Famagusta's harbour, and was originally the main entrance to the town. The tower was restored 3 years after Cyprus was sold to the Republic of Venice, under the command of captain Nicolo Foscari. After the restoration the Lion of St. Marcus was engraved on the entrance, along with captain Nicolo Foscari's name and the date (1492). The castle gets its name from Shakespeare's famous play Othello, which is set in a harbour town in Cyprus. In 1566 the castle was moved to the prison.

Othello castle also has a refectory and a dormitory constructed during the Lusignan period. In the courtyard, there are old cannons lying on the ground. One of them is made of bronze and is over 400 years old. There are some iron cannon balls lying about, as well as some stone balls that would have been used in a trebuchet. It is rumoured that the Venetian merchants, during the Ottoman siege, hid their fortunes down here and sealed the tunnels up. As they were not allowed to take anything with them when they were allowed to leave the city, these treasures are still supposed to be there.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Cyprus

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Stefan Ghiuta (9 months ago)
Best bar ever, a MUST experience if you get here in Famagosta
Liam Burke (2 years ago)
Amazing meze, live music was bang on. Great night out
Yazan Awad (2 years ago)
The best place ever. High quality service and delicious food.
özge serin (2 years ago)
I have to say: it was the best traditional Turkish meze experience in full service!
Gengiz Hasim (2 years ago)
Lovely restaurant but if you get there set menu be prepared to wait until its completely full before food starts getting served and expect little bits at a time ,it takes a bit of getting used to
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