The region round the bay of Salamis is one of the most favoured in the whole island and Salamis city became the capital of Cyprus as far back as 1100 BC. The city shared the destiny of the rest of the island during the successive occupations by the various dominant powers of the Near East, viz. the Assyrians, Egyptians, Persians, and Romans. The ancient site covers an area of one square mile extending along the sea shore. There is still a large area awaiting excavation and this is forested with mimosa, pine, and eucalyptus trees. The finding of some gold coins bearing the name of Evagoras, 411 to 374 BC, is the first genuine evidence of the city's importance.

A severe earthquake destroyed the city in 76 AD after which the Gymnasium with its colonnaded Palaestra was built by Trajan and Hadrian. This is the most monumental part of the site but columns differ in size because after the second great earthquake of 331 AD. the Christians set up new columns which they dragged from the Roman theatre. The theatre with 50 rows of seats is a spectacular sight. All around the buildings that have been excavated are many niches which contained marble statues, and those that can be seen are headless. When Christianity was adopted as a state religion all these nude statues were to them an abhorrence and were thrown into drains or were broken up. In fact, any indications of Roman pagan religion such as mosaic pictures were effaced or destroyed.

The Romans had an obsession about baths, and in the Great Hall buildings one can make out the Sudatorium (hot baths), the Caldarium (steam bath) and Frigidarium. Before the Christian period, i.e. before 400 AD, it was quite a colourful city; the marble columns were covered with coloured stucco, coloured statues, and numerous polychrome mosaics of which only a few are left. It was during the Christian period that walls with rectangular towers at regular intervals were built, but all that one can see of these today are mounds of sand dunes. The late Roman period after 400 AD up to about 1100 AD is known as the Byzantine epoch when the first great Christian churches, called basilicas, were built. The visitor should see the churches of St Epiphanos and Campanopetra for they are the largest ancient churches in Cyprus.

About 674 AD Arab invasions brought about the destruction of the entire city and the inhabitants fled north to build the medieval town of Famagusta (Magusa). There must have been a great change in the climate as the city was overwhelmed with sand, and only the tops of the columns peeped above.

Coins of the Middle Ages, Lusignan period, were found around the basilicas, from which one can conclude that squatters lived in the ruins probably up to c. 1300. For the next 600 years the ancient site was looted and regarded as a quarry for building. During the Venetian occupation of Famagusta many columns and pieces of sculpture were dragged from the site. This constant looting was not halted until I952 when organised excavations by the Department of Antiquities began.

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Salamis, Famagusta, Cyprus
See all sites in Famagusta

Details

Founded: 1100 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Cyprus

More Information

www.whatson-northcyprus.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christopher Maher (9 days ago)
We visited a couple of weeks ago and thoroughly enjoyed our stay. The food is good and served throughout the day. The rooms are tidy. The only constructive point is that the rooms were quite warm and stuffy at night- we had to leave the balcony door open to keep the room cool. We enjoyed the swimming pools. They also had entertainment for the kids - our daughter loved it. The Chinese restaurant hadn't opened by the time of our visit. We will stay here again.
Anna Khodos (10 days ago)
Good hotel, nice room, amazing sea vie from the one side of the room. But pool view from the other side and too aggressive animation programs, karaoke evening all the evening was horrible and too loud. If you seek for peace and silence - it's not here. If you are a good drinker - you are welcome! Animators are funny and very active. Check in took 2 hours but I got a good room with a nice sea view but with a party stage behind other window, running fun till midnight. Besides loud parties and animation - I have nothing to complain. It's all up to your preferences.
Javad Rezaee (2 months ago)
Nice place for relaxation. Good stuff and delicious food. In cold season inside pool is very comfortable to use
Bogna Kuzia (7 months ago)
Can't imagine better hotel for kids! All service very helpful and kind. Kids are very welcome here. For the very first time I meet service at restaurants that was happy to look at my kid when I wanted to take something to eat. I recommend that with all my heart!
Svetlana Sikorskaya (9 months ago)
Very good place to stay in Northern Cyprus! Clean, roomy, comfortable. Good Spa at reasonable prices. Nice beach. A new Chinese restaurant open not long ago is one of the places to visit on this side of Cyprus. Good service, friendly staff! Recommend to visit :)
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