The fortress in Muiden, known as Muizenfort is part of the Stelling van Amsterdam, the UNESCO World Heritage site that consists of a set of forts around the city of Amsterdam. The defence line was 135 km long ring of fortifications around Amsterdam, consisting of 42 forts located between 10 to 15 kilometers the centre, and lowlands that can easily be flooded in time of war. The flooding was designed to give a depth of about 30 cm, insufficient for boats to traverse. Any buildings within 1 km of the line had to be made of wood, so that they could be burnt and the obstruction removed. The Stelling van Amsterdam was constructed between 1880 and 1920. The invention of the aeroplane and tankmade the forts obsolete almost as soon as they were finished.

These days, the Muiden fort is used for offices as well as a small museum, the Muider Muizenfort Museum (MMM).

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Founded: 1880-1920
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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A Google User (2 years ago)
A Google User (2 years ago)
A Google User (2 years ago)
A Google User (2 years ago)
Leider darf man ohne als Erwachsener 15.50 und als Kind 9 Euro zu bezahlen nicht mal drum herum am Wasser entlang laufen. Sehr enttäuschend, das Familien soo abgezockt werden.
A Google User (2 years ago)
Mooi verhaal over de Hollandse Waterlinies en plek van de Vesting Muiden en de Stelling van Amsterdam daar binnen. Een aanrader om er even naar binnen te lopen. Het is gratis te bezoeken.
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