Heukelum Castle, also known for a long time as Merckenburg, is situated just outside the old fortified town of Heukelum on the border of Gelderland and South Holland. The illustrious Van Arkel family had the castle built in around 1286. It was once a sturdy castle with towers, a courtyard, a double moat and a fortified bailey. Nowadays, it has the appearance of an 18th-century country house.

The reason why Jan van Arkel had the castle built in around 1286 has to do with the crusades. When the knight Jan van Arkel was encamped beneath the walls of Jerusalem during the Fifth Crusade, he had a vision. Tradition has it that the Archangel Gabriel appeared above the walls of Jerusalem and said, ‘Go where this swan takes you and build your castle there.’ Jan van Arkel sailed in his ship behind the swan and when the swan settled in Heukelum, the family gave orders for a castle to be built there.Arkel WarHeukelum Castle was one of nine castles intended to strengthen the family’s position along the turbulent border between Guelders and Holland. All of them were destroyed during the Arkel War (1401-1412) except Heukelum. Merckenburg Castle is therefore the last remaining castle of the Arkel family. For a long time, Heukelum remained an important manorial court; a mini-state with its own currency and various privileges.

In Het Rampjaar of 1672 (literally the year of disaster, which marked the start of the Franco-Dutch War of 1672-1678), the troops of the French kingLouis XIVmarched into Holland. They were held back by the waterline, whereupon the French plundered and burned all of the buildings situated south of this temporary border. Heukelum, by then an obsolete fortress, succumbed to the same fate and the castle and the town were severely damaged. It is a miracle that the medieval gate tower is still standing. In 1732, a double Amsterdam canal house was built against the old tower.

Today, Heukelum Castle is a private residence and is not open to the public.

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Founded: 1286
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

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User Reviews

Riviera Fotograaf (4 years ago)
Prachtig!!!
J.F.TIRADOR (4 years ago)
Mooie omgeving....is een privé terrein en er zijn verschillende kamers waar mensen wonen...om en na het kasteel kun je wandelen ...ligt vlak aan de linge
Ester Dammers (4 years ago)
Mooi kasteeltje, jammer dat je er niet bij kunt (niet verder dan het hek).
Danielle Kieboom (4 years ago)
Mooi oud kasteel. Ben er vroeger nog in geweest. Bij de oude baron.
tim verlaat (4 years ago)
Gerend voor mijn leven. Bordjes verboden toegang en toen achtervolgd door twee vechthonden.
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Lorca Castle

Castle of Lorca (Castillo de Lorca) is a fortress of medieval origin constructed between the 9th and 15th centuries. It consists of a series of defensive structures that, during the Middle Ages, made the town and the fortress an impregnable point in the southeast part of the Iberian Peninsula. Lorca Castle was a key strategic point of contention between Christians and Muslims during the Reconquista.

Archaeological excavations have revealed that the site of the castle has been inhabited since Neolithic times.

Muslim Era

It has not been determined exactly when a castle or fortress was first built on the hill. The first written documentation referring to a castle at Lorca is of Muslim origin, which in the 9th century, indicates that the city of Lurqa was an important town in the area ruled by Theudimer (Tudmir). During Muslim rule, Lorca Castle was an impregnable fortress and its interior was divided into two sections by the Espaldón Wall. In the western part, there was an area used to protect livestock and grain in times of danger. The eastern part had a neighbourhood called the barrio de Alcalá.

After Reconquista

Lorca was conquered by the Castilian Infante Don Alfonso, the future Alfonso X, in 1244, and the fortress became a key defensive point against the Kingdom of Granada. For 250 years, Lorca Castle was a watchpoint on the border between the Christian kingdom of Murcia and the Muslim state of Granada.

Alfonso X ordered the construction of the towers known as the Alfonsina and Espolón Towers, and strengthened and fixed the walls. Hardly a trace of the Muslim fortress remained due to this reconstruction. Muslim traces remain in the foundation stones and the wall known as the muro del Espaldón.

The Jewish Quarter was found within the alcazaba, the Moorish fortification, separated from the rest of the city by its walls. The physical separation had the purpose of protecting the Jewish people in the town from harm, but also had the result of keeping Christians and Jews separate, with the Christians inhabiting the lower part of town.

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Modern history

With the disappearance of the frontier after the conquest of Granada in 1492, Lorca Castle no longer became as important as before. With the expulsion of the Jews by order of Ferdinand and Isabella, Lorca Castle was also depopulated as a result. The castle was abandoned completely, and was almost a complete ruin by the 18th century. In the 19th century, the castle was refurbished due to the War of Spanish Independence. The walls and structures were repaired or modified and its medieval look changed. A battery of cannons was installed, for example, during this time. In 1931 Lorca Castle was declared a National Historic Monument.

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