Electoral Palace

Koblenz, Germany

The Electoral Palace was the residence of the last Archbishop and Elector of Trier, Clemens Wenceslaus of Saxony, who commissioned the building in the late 18th century. It was erected between 1777–1793. In the mid-19th century, the Prussian Crown Prince (later Emperor Wilhelm I) had his official residence there during his years as military governor of the Rhine Province and the Province of Westphalia. It now houses various offices of the federal government.

The Electoral Palace is one of the most important examples of the early French neoclassical great house in Southwestern Germany, and with Schloss Wilhelmshöhe in Kassel, the Prince Bishop's Palace in Münster and Ludwigsburg Palace, one of the last palaces built in Germany before the French Revolution. Since 2002 it has been part of the Rhine Gorge UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it is also a protected cultural property under the Hague Convention.

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Details

Founded: 1777-1793
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Wladislav Sidorov (4 months ago)
An absolutely beautiful castle in the middle of the city, not far away from the Rhine. Also a place where local events regularly happen, including a market with handcrafted goods in Summer!
Elric Templin (4 months ago)
Beautiful but no public toilets and castle seems to be closed even though it says open till 19:00
Nicolas Gavrys (5 months ago)
Nice and beautiful place, open from all sides.
Vasiliki Koutskoudi (11 months ago)
Great view , haven't visited indoors
Subash Krishna (13 months ago)
Nice place for a day's visit
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