Electoral Palace

Koblenz, Germany

The Electoral Palace was the residence of the last Archbishop and Elector of Trier, Clemens Wenceslaus of Saxony, who commissioned the building in the late 18th century. It was erected between 1777–1793. In the mid-19th century, the Prussian Crown Prince (later Emperor Wilhelm I) had his official residence there during his years as military governor of the Rhine Province and the Province of Westphalia. It now houses various offices of the federal government.

The Electoral Palace is one of the most important examples of the early French neoclassical great house in Southwestern Germany, and with Schloss Wilhelmshöhe in Kassel, the Prince Bishop's Palace in Münster and Ludwigsburg Palace, one of the last palaces built in Germany before the French Revolution. Since 2002 it has been part of the Rhine Gorge UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it is also a protected cultural property under the Hague Convention.

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Details

Founded: 1777-1793
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Subash Krishna (5 months ago)
Nice place for a day's visit
Satu Kuusiluoma (6 months ago)
Beautiful garden!
Parth Moradiya (7 months ago)
Good castle with beautiful summer garden. Nice place
Bill hussle (18 months ago)
There’s a garden in the back of the palace with paths for visitors to walk on. Very well kept
Mitr Friend (20 months ago)
Designed by architect of the Prussian Era was Clemens Wenzeslaus. Today's Electoral Palace was the favourite residence of Prince Wilhelm of Prussia & his wife Augusta. These were built in late 1800s.
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