Eibingen Abbey (in German Abtei St. Hildegard) is Benedictine nunnery, originally founded in 1165 by Hildegard von Bingen. It was dissolved at the beginning of the 19th century during the secularization of this part of Germany. The present community was established by Charles, 6th Prince of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg in 1904 and re-settled from St. Gabriel's Abbey, Bertholdstein. The nunnery belongs to the Beuronese Congregation within the Benedictine Confederation. The current buildings were also built between 1900-1904 in Neo-Romanticism style.

In 1941, the nuns were expelled by the Nazis; they were not able to return until 1945. In 1988, the sisters founded Marienrode Priory at Hildesheim, which became independent of Eibingen in 1998.

The nuns work in the vineyard and in the craft workshops, besides undertaking the traditional duties of hospitality. They can be heard (but not seen) singing their regular services. The abbey is a Rhine Gorge World Heritage Site. The church has been used for concerts of the Rheingau Musik Festival, such as a 'BachTrompetenGala' with Edgar Krapp, organ.

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Details

Founded: 1900-1904
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steve Fowler (10 months ago)
Great view, decided not to try to go in, just ran out of time.
Bob Richmond (11 months ago)
Beautiful.but not really much to see. Shops are nice, but not my purpose.
Sergey Ivanov (13 months ago)
Great place to visit. 2 k from Rüdesheim, easy hike up the hill. Definitely recommend.
Joseph Rozman (14 months ago)
Peaceful and spiritual in the Chapel, you need to hear the nuns sing their vespers, very holy experience
Bivin Baby (16 months ago)
Beautiful Nuns Abbey! It was a pleasure to visit this famous Abbey. A short drive from Frankfurt. Vineyards and marvelous Rhein River makes this place even more beautiful. Wine ? war super delicious. It is a must try day out trip for family and wine lovers
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