Eibingen Abbey (in German Abtei St. Hildegard) is Benedictine nunnery, originally founded in 1165 by Hildegard von Bingen. It was dissolved at the beginning of the 19th century during the secularization of this part of Germany. The present community was established by Charles, 6th Prince of Löwenstein-Wertheim-Rosenberg in 1904 and re-settled from St. Gabriel's Abbey, Bertholdstein. The nunnery belongs to the Beuronese Congregation within the Benedictine Confederation. The current buildings were also built between 1900-1904 in Neo-Romanticism style.

In 1941, the nuns were expelled by the Nazis; they were not able to return until 1945. In 1988, the sisters founded Marienrode Priory at Hildesheim, which became independent of Eibingen in 1998.

The nuns work in the vineyard and in the craft workshops, besides undertaking the traditional duties of hospitality. They can be heard (but not seen) singing their regular services. The abbey is a Rhine Gorge World Heritage Site. The church has been used for concerts of the Rheingau Musik Festival, such as a 'BachTrompetenGala' with Edgar Krapp, organ.

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Details

Founded: 1900-1904
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Steff Boyes (15 months ago)
I have been to the Abbey once before but decided to go again! This time, the weather was beautiful and warm, making the building look truly magnificent. I attended a service in the church - the sisters sounded like angels when they sang. Words can’t describe how beautiful each hymn sounded! A blessing to my ears, and an incredibly spiritual experience. Highly recommend - worth the hike out of the main town!
Martin Trevelyan-Jones (16 months ago)
An imposing building on the slopes above Rudesheim, dedicated to the memory of an amazing woman. The Abbey was constructed between 1900 and 1908 above the site of Hildegard's original convent at Eibigen near Rudesheim which dated to the mid 12th century. The solid, massive building constructed of reddish brown sandstone and quartzite is reminiscent of some ancient Roman buildings, giving an impression of permanence. The western facade is framed by twin towers. The nave of the Abbey is simple encouraging quiet contemplation, and is dominated by the almost overpowering painting of Christ above the altar. Everything else seems a little insignificant by comparison. The nuns follow the Benedictine tradition, dedicating their lives to God while working in a community. They run a successful bookshop, which also sells a variety of goods including art, candles and wine. In addition they repair books and manuscripts and research into St. Hildegard's works. There is also a cafe which is open daily except Mondays. St. Hildegard who was born in 1098 was a polymath - composing music and chants which are still performed (CDs may be purchased in the shop), she created art, much of which was based on religious visions, andwas renowned for her medical knowledge. An truly amazing woman. I really can't recommend a visit to the Abbey too much. A circular walk from Rudesheim to the Abbey and then along just below the treeline to the Germania statue at Neiderwald-Denkmal is a beautiful way to spend half a day.
Tom Humphreys (18 months ago)
pretty Abby worth a little side trip to
Cristiano Baldoncini (22 months ago)
Magnific, no words to describe. Sure you have to see
J. Carl Schultz (2 years ago)
Wonderfully spiritual! And such a gracefilled place!
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