Thurant Castle

Alken, Germany

Thurant Castle (Burg Thurant) was built in 1198-1206 by Heinrich Pfalgraf Guelphs. It was besieged in 1246-1248 during the war between Trier and Cologne archbishops. After the war the castle was interestingly divided to two parts, Trier tower and Cologne Tower. Both sides had a separate entrance and living buildings. In the 19th century the castle was left to decay, but restored in the 20th century.

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Address

Bachstraße 50, Alken, Germany
See all sites in Alken

Details

Founded: 1198-1206
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.thurant.de

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

-- (2 years ago)
Very nice place. Interesting torture-tower with real bones.
Dennis Post (2 years ago)
Beautiful little castle and area. Free to walk about and examine everything. No information about the rooms or objects.
Jens Graikowski (2 years ago)
I came upon this beautiful castle on my way to Eltz castle years ago and I keep visiting both. They are both very different. The more famous Eltz castle is imposing and impressive, showing off the wealth and political power of the owners. Thurant castle is smallish, partly ruin, though still lived in, overgrown and romantic, with stunning views down to the Moselle river.
Pearl Xia (2 years ago)
A great castle! Adult only €4, and children under 5 for free. Great view and environment. You can visit there on your own without any guided tour. A great place for children.
Paul Cooper (2 years ago)
An informative leaflet in different languages was included with the entrance fee. As with most historical sites, not for those who have difficulty in walking.
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