Kinderdijk Windmills

Kinderdijk, Netherlands

Kinderdijk village is situated in a polder in the Alblasserwaard at the confluence of the Lek and Noord rivers. To drain the polder, a system of 19 windmills was built around 1740. This group of mills is the largest concentration of old windmills in the Netherlands. The windmills of Kinderdijk are one of the best-known Dutch tourist sites. They have been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1997.

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Founded: 1740
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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elio Lianto (9 months ago)
I visited this place twice, both luckily not on a busy season. It's a great place for family , just walk around the canals and the windmills.Some exhibitions available if you are want to know more. If you're interested to find out how the Dutch managed to tame the ocean, this is the place to start. Downside is they lacking restroom, but i can understand as this is a world heritage site , so it must be preserved as it is.
Peter Surmanis (9 months ago)
I have been there twice now, and each time brings a new amazement. It truly feels like one has stepped back in time. As a tourist, to just walk around (be weary of the bicycles coming through) and take in the age of the windmills, and to understand the history, is truly breathtaking. When I go back to the Netherlands, I will try my best to visit again.
AROUND THE WORLD (15 months ago)
Beautiful place ...to relax..walking..biking...but avoid weekends when you would like to make nice shots...the weekends are overcrowded...choose a weekday
Jan Schreuder (16 months ago)
Very nice and interesting. Just needs a few improvements in my opinion. First of all the language is a big barrier if you don’t speak Dutch. The lady at the reception knew English and explained us everything perfectly. After that it was a struggle. Personal hardly spook any English except for one or two. Everybody was very friendly but very difficult to understand, we felt we missed out on a lot of things. On the River cruise there was no guide. We just sat there for half an hour going up and down the river with no explanation what so ever. They speak very highly about their app for the mobile but it didn’t serve us at all. Audio guides only if you go walking, no separate audio guides for the windmill museums. The walking path ends at the first museum, only half of the whole distance to the museum furthest away. The second half you have to use the circle path to get to the end on foot, not very safe. My 4 stars is because I think it’s a great place to visit and it has a lot of history. The views of the windmills are spectacular, just needs a few practical improvements to make it perfect.
Luigi Iannini (16 months ago)
Amazing place, visited in 2014. We travelled there from Rotterdam, taking a clipper boat. Once we arrived, we rented a bicycle which in my opinion, is the best way to visit Kinderdijk, because there is a very nice cycle pathway going throughout the windmills. It is also possible to visit one of the windmills, but we decided not to do it. I think we should have done it and I feel to recommend it, so you will avoid any regret.
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