Kamp Schoorl was the first concentration camp in the Netherlands, established in 1940 soon after the German troops were occupied Netherlands. Among the prisoners were also people from England, Belgium and France. After a few months the French and the Belgian were released. The English prisoners were transferred to a German camp Gleiwitz in September 1940.

The first Jews, captured in 22th and 23th February 1941 in Amsterdam, were transferred in an army truck to the camp. The group of 425 people only stayed for 4 days after which they are transferred to concentration camp Buchenwald where they again are transferred in June 1941 to concentration camp Mauthausen. Only two of this group survived the war.

For about 1,900 people was the camp their first camp before being transferred to other camps. More than 1,000 of them never returned, mainly Jews and political prisoners. The regime in the camp was mild compared to the other Dutch camps. There was not heavy labour and there was enough food.

The camp was closed by the Germans because the camp was too small and located between the dunes. It was not easy to enlarge it. In October 1941 the camp was closed. Some of the prisonars were released, but most of the prisoners were transferred to Kamp Amersfoort. 25 women were directly transported to concentration camp Ravensbrück. Until the end of the war, militia of the Wehrmacht and the Organisation Todt used the camp as a base.

After the war the camp was used to imprison NSB members and was finally demolished in 1950.

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    7, Schrool, Netherlands
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    Founded: 1940
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    User Reviews

    Elke Mollenhauer (3 years ago)
    Mooi Schoorl, zum ersten aber nicht zum letzten Mal. Alles bestens, ein tolles Haus, alles sauber, mehr als ausreichend eingerichtet. Hilfe bei kleinen Mängeln war sofort vor Ort. Die Beleuchtung ist etwas sparsam, aber sonst alles top. Danke auch für die Freundlichkeit an der Rezeption, die uns überwältigt hat. Wir hatten eine schöne Zeit
    extreme auto fan (3 years ago)
    Ik vindt hellemal mooi
    Thomas M. (3 years ago)
    Ein wunderbarer "Ort im Ort" - zumindest wohl jetzt im Herbst und somit sehr nach unserem Geschmack. Eine hervorragende Rezeption, kurze Wege, direkte Anbindung an den hübschen Ort Schoorl mit seinen vielen Geschäften und authentischen Lokalitäten... Häuser mit Komplettausstattung, wie man sie in Holland so nicht findet. Wir kommen gerne wieder!
    Bas Diender (3 years ago)
    Mooi, goed onderhouden park, ruime villa's pal aan de duinen en het centrum van Schoorl op loopafstand. Alle ingrediënten voor een paar dagen heerlijk weg.
    Torsten Frary (3 years ago)
    Top, da ist nicht mehr viel Luft nach oben! Sehr liebevoll eingerichtet.
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