The Musée Rodin was opened in 1919 and is dedicated to the works of the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. It has two sites, at the Hôtel Biron and surrounding grounds in central Paris, and just outside Paris at Rodin's old home, the Villa des Brillants at Meudon (Hauts-de-Seine). The collection includes 6,600 sculptures, 8,000 drawings, 8,000 old photographs and 7,000 objets d’art. The museum receives 700,000 visitors annually.

While living in the Villa des Brillants Rodin used the Hôtel Biron as his workshop from 1908, and subsequently donated his entire collection of sculptures (along with paintings by Vincent van Gogh and Pierre-Auguste Renoir that he had acquired) to the French State on the condition that they turn the buildings into a museum dedicated to his works.

The Musée Rodin contains most of Rodin's significant creations, including The Thinker, The Kiss and The Gates of Hell. Many of his sculptures are displayed in the museum's extensive garden. The museum is one of the most accessible museums in Paris. It is located near a Metro stop, Varenne, in a central neighborhood and the entrance fee is very reasonable. The gardens around the museum building contain many of the famous sculptures in natural settings. Behind the museum building is a small lake and casual restaurant.

The museum has also a room dedicated to works of Camille Claudel. Some paintings by Monet, Renoir and Van Gogh which were in Rodin's personal collections are also presented. The Musée Rodin collections are very diverse, as Rodin used to collect besides being an artist.

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Address

Rue de Varenne 79, Paris, France
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Details

Founded: 1919
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eat Joy & Love (14 months ago)
Included in the Paris Pass. Small and easy museum to see Rodin escultures. Good option if you want to take a breath. There is a coffee place in the museum area.
Mariya Kulichenko (14 months ago)
Worth visiting especially if you are onto sculpture. Roden's works are brilliant! They look alive! They can inspire you and the names of them are going to make you think different
Zoran (14 months ago)
A small but very impressive installation. The museum gives a very good presentation of the development of Rodin's ideas, their evolution and realization. The study of the Balzac statue was my personal highlight. In the gardens the final major bronze statues are the true treat - if the weather allows it.
Lee Snell (15 months ago)
There have been extensive renovations done here. The mansion was formerly a hotel. I highly recommend that you allow at least two hours to visit or even longer. There is a metro stop very close and within walking distance to this museum. Rodin's sculptures are amazing. You will not be disappointed!
Melvin Diaz (2 years ago)
Another good place to visit while in Paris. The main attraction is the famous statue of the thinker. When entering there, you can either get a full ticket or one just for the gardens. Located at wakable distance from metro and bus stops. Take a time to enjoy the garden also.
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