Montparnasse Cemetery

Paris, France

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.

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Details

Founded: 1824
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Monika Schomburg (3 months ago)
There are more atmospheric cementeries in Paris, but this one has a lot of celebrities. Visit Susan Sontag. She is not mentioned on the board I think!
MJ Omidi (3 months ago)
So peaceful
Katrina W (4 months ago)
Nice and quiet place where you can sit down on a bench and contemplate the passing of life.
Aaron Gray (5 months ago)
The cemetery is roughly 47 acres and is the second largest cemetery in Paris. The cemetery has over 35,000 graves and approximately a thousand people are buried here each year. The cemetery contains 35,000 plots and is the resting place to a variety of individuals including political figures, philosophers, artists, actors, and writers. Additionally, in the cemetery one can find a number of tombs commemorating those who died in the Franco-Prussian war during the Siege of Paris (1870-1871) and the Paris Commune (1871).
Sara McAteer (15 months ago)
Beautiful cemetery. The grounds are well maintained, and there are laminated maps available to be borrowed from the entrance booths. It is larger than I thought it would be, but truly beautiful. The graves range in age and opulence. Some of the mausoleums are not in the best state, but that is to be expected. One thing to remember while visiting is that there are people coming to pay their respects to family members. Please keep that in mind. While tourists may love the gorgeous graves and mausoleums, it is still an active cemetery, so please be respectful.
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