Montparnasse Cemetery

Paris, France

Montparnasse Cemetery was created from three farms in 1824. Cemeteries had been banned from Paris since the closure, owing to health concerns, of the Cimetière des Innocents in 1786. Several new cemeteries outside the precincts of the capital replaced all the internal Parisian ones in the early 19th century: Montmartre Cemetery in the north, Père Lachaise Cemetery in the east, and Montparnasse Cemetery in the south. At the heart of the city, and today sitting in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower, is Passy Cemetery.

Montparnasse cemetery is the burial place of many of France's intellectual and artistic elite as well as publishers and others who promoted the works of authors and artists. There are also many graves of foreigners who have made France their home, as well as monuments to police and firefighters killed in the line of duty in the city of Paris.

The cemetery is divided by Rue Émile Richard. The small section is usually referred to as the small cemetery (petit cimetière) and the large section as the big cemetery (grand cimetière).

Although Baudelaire is buried in this cemetery (division 6), there is also a cenotaph to him (between division 26 and 27). Because of the many notable people buried there, it is a highly popular tourist attraction.

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Details

Founded: 1824
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J Scott Brubacher (18 months ago)
Final resting place for Camille Saint-Seans and Jean-Paul Sartre.
Tennille Sanders (19 months ago)
Such a peaceful and beautiful place to walk around and remember the history and people of Paris in years gone by. Truly quite fascinating to walk through and see the crypts both new and old side by side, an interesting testament to the way Paris has endured as a city with so many eras cohesively blending together.
Tricia Crain (2 years ago)
Beautiful and somewhat chilling. It's amazing that there are whole sections of the cemetery are from within the last decade mixed in with crypts that are much older. A timeless place.
Mimi Mela (2 years ago)
Seems strange to rate a cemetery. But this is one of the best thing that I did it in Paris so I walking pass and when get in there and stay an hour to look around. I can feel some sad and love in there. This place can put me out from the busy world and become peaceful.
Hanča Kadrić (2 years ago)
This is a beautiful cemetery in the city centre, split in two by a city road! Although nearly 200 years old, it is very well maintained. I paid my respects to the resting place of author Guy De Maupassant, whose stories I enjoyed during my school days. You can spend a few hours walking through the serene lanes here and find some solace.
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